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DependingService depends on service object that is injected asynchronously and dynamically to DependingService.setService(Object). If DependingService.doSomething() is called before service object is set, then thread should wait 5 seconds for service to be available.

How to do proper and effective locking? My first approach looks like this:

import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.Condition;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReadWriteLock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantReadWriteLock;

public class DependingService {

    private final ReadWriteLock rwLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
    private final Condition condition = rwLock.writeLock().newCondition();
    private Object service;


    // service injected dynamically by container
    public void setService(final Object service) {
        rwLock.writeLock().lock();
        try {
            this.service = service;
            System.out.println("Signalling");
            condition.signalAll();
        } finally {
            rwLock.writeLock().unlock();
        }
    }


    public void doSomething() {
        rwLock.readLock().lock();
        try {
            if (service == null) {
                // we can't upgrade to write lock, so release read lock first
                rwLock.readLock().unlock();
                rwLock.writeLock().lock();
                try {
                    if (service == null) {
                        System.out.println("Waiting fo 5 seconds");
                        condition.await(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
                    }
                } catch (final InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                } finally {
                    // downgrade to read lock
                    rwLock.readLock().lock();
                    rwLock.writeLock().unlock();
                }
                if (service == null) {
                    throw new RuntimeException("service is null");
                }
            }

            // use the service
            System.out.println(service.toString());
        } finally {
            rwLock.readLock().unlock();
        }
    }

}

Edit: Note that DependingService.setService(Object) may be anytime and multiple times set to null or any other object.

share|improve this question
    
How frequently is setServive called? Numerous times (100+) every second? Once every x seconds / minutes? –  assylias Feb 4 '13 at 14:14
    
One issue with your code is that condition.await(...) can awake spuriously - so you should put that statement in a loop, in which case your timeout won't work any more. –  assylias Feb 4 '13 at 14:31
    
assylias: normally it should be called only once, but noone never knows (it is actually in OSGi environment) –  Martin Feb 4 '13 at 14:47

2 Answers 2

I can't think of an easy way to build that behaviour with the high level API. See below a suggestion using a wait/notify pattern. Main points:

  • service is volatile to ensure visibility without having to lock for reading
  • service is always copied locally in doSomething to prevent a case where you check that service is not null then call service.toString() and get a NPE because setService(null); has been called in the meantime.
  • the waiting time is adjusted at each while loop to make sure you don't wait more than 5 seconds.
  • it uses basic synchronization, but only when service is null - in the base case where service is not null, there is no contention in doSomething. If you call setService many times every ms, you could face performance problems.

Note: not tested.

public class DependingService {

    private final Object lock = new Object();
    private volatile Object service;

    // service injected dynamically by container
    public void setService(final Object service) {
        this.service = service;
        synchronized(lock) {
            lock.notifyAll();
        }
    }

    public void doSomething() throws InterruptedException {
        //make a local copy to avoid problems due to service becoming
        //null in the middle of the method
        Object localService = service; 
        if (localService == null ) {
            long end = System.nanoTime() + TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS.convert(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
            synchronized(lock) {
                while ((localService = service) == null) {
                    long waitNanos = end - System.nanoTime();
                    if (waitNanos < 0) break;
                    lock.wait(waitNanos / 1000000);
                }
            }
        }
        if (localService == null) {
            throw new RuntimeException("timeout: service is still null");
        }
        // use the service
        System.out.println(localService.toString());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
why are you going through all that trouble to use nanos instead of millis? –  jtahlborn Feb 4 '13 at 15:10
    
@jtahlborn not necessary indeed. I tend to use nanotime by default when measuring a short period - but for 5 seconds currentMillis would work as well. –  assylias Feb 4 '13 at 15:12

Maybe it is better to use CountDownLatch like this:

public class DependingService {
    private final CountDownLatch serviceLatch = new CountDownLatch (1);
    private Object service;

    public void setService (final Object service) 
    {
        this.service = service;
        serviceLatch.countDown ();
    }

    public void doSomething () throws InterruptedException
    {
        if (!serviceLatch.await (5, TimeUnit.SECONDS))
            throw new RuntimeException ("Service is still null");

        // Service is not null here
        System.out.println (service);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is not explicitly mentioned, but container may later call setService(null) so your approach would not work it that case. But thanks for introducing me CountDownLatch :-) –  Martin Feb 4 '13 at 13:50

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