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I want to use Byte Pair Encoding to decompress a byte array. The sourcecode (not from me) I have is using filestream to read a file byte by byte. However, I want to decompress char *.

I have been trying to convert this using stringstream and other things, but I can't figure out how to do this.

I would like to use it like this: expand(char *inputarray, char *outputarray)

I am new to c++, just switched from vb.net, so don't be too hard on me :)

This is the code:

/* expand.c */
/* Copyright 1994 by Philip Gage */

#include <stdio.h>

/* decompress data from input to output */
void expand (FILE *input, FILE *output)
{
  unsigned char left[256], right[256], stack[30];
  short int c, count, i, size;

  /* unpack each block until end of file */
  while (( count = getc ( input )) != EOF )
  {
    /* set left to itself as literal flag */
    for ( i = 0 ; i < 256; i++ )
    {
      left[i] = i;
    }

    /* read pair table */
    for ( c = 0 ; ; )
    {
      /* skip range of literal bytes */
      if ( count > 127 )
      {
        c += count -127;
        count = 0;
      }
      if ( c==256 )
      { 
        break;
      }

      /* read pairs, skip right if literal */
      for ( i = 0; i <= count; i++, c++ )
      {
        left[c] = getc(input);
        if ( c != left[c] )
        {
          right[c] = getc(input);
        }
      }
      if (c == 256)
      {
        break;
      }
      count = getc(input);
    }

    /* calculate packed data block size */
    size = 256 * getc(input) + getc(input);

    /* unpack data block */
    for ( i = 0 ; ; )
    {
      /* pop byte from stack or read byte */
      if ( i )
      { 
        c = stack[--i];
      }
      else
      {
        if ( !size--)
        {
          break;
        }
        c = getc(input);
      }

      /* output byte or push pair on stack */
      if ( c == left[c] )
      {
        putc(c, output);
      }
      else
      {
        stack[i++] = right[c];
        stack[i++] = left[c];
      }
    }
  }
}

void main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
  FILE *infile, *outfile;

  if ( argc != 3 )
  {
    printf("Usage: expand infile outfile\n");
  }
  else
  {
    if (( infile = fopen(argv[1],"rb"))==NULL)
    {
      printf("Error opening input %s\n",argv[1]);
    }
    else
    {  
      if ((outfile=fopen(argv[2],"wb"))==NULL)
      {
        printf("Error opening output %s\n", argv[2]);
      }
      else
      {
        expand ( infile, outfile );
        fclose ( outfile );
        fclose ( infile );
      }
    }
  }
}

/* end of file */
share|improve this question
    
It seems that expand reads and writes to a file, with ifstream you could read the file output back into your program and go ahead that way. –  Tony The Lion Feb 4 '13 at 14:09
1  
That is C, not C++. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 4 '13 at 14:10
1  
this isn't C either, its garbageC (void main) –  Aniket Feb 4 '13 at 14:11
    
Can the "encrypted" data contain a zero byte? –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 4 '13 at 14:19
1  
@MaximYegorushkin I think the question is "How to convert the expand() function to read from a char * instead of a FILE * –  Aniket Feb 4 '13 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

This does what you want it to do I guess. The functions str_getc() and str_putc() are equivalent of putc(int , FILE *) and getc(FILE *)

int sCtr = 0, dCtr = 0;
int str_getc(char *str) { return str[sCtr++]; } //char * equivalent of getc()
void str_putc(int c, char *str) { str[dCtr++] = c; } //char * equivalent of putc()

void expand (char *input, char *output)
{
  unsigned char left[256], right[256], stack[30];
  short int c, count, i, size;

  /* unpack each block until end of file */
  while (( count = str_getc ( input )) != -1)
  {
    /* set left to itself as literal flag */
    for ( i = 0 ; i < 256; i++ )
    {
      left[i] = i;
    }

    /* read pair table */
    for ( c = 0 ; ; )
    {
      /* skip range of literal bytes */
      if ( count > 127 )
      {
        c += count -127;
        count = 0;
      }
      if ( c==256 )
      { 
        break;
      }

      /* read pairs, skip right if literal */
      for ( i = 0; i <= count; i++, c++ )
      {
        left[c] = str_getc(input);
        if ( c != left[c] )
        {
          right[c] = str_getc(input);
        }
      }
      if (c == 256)
      {
        break;
      }
      count = str_getc(input);
    }

    /* calculate packed data block size */
    size = 256 * str_getc(input) + str_getc(input);

    /* unpack data block */
    for ( i = 0 ; ; )
    {
      /* pop byte from stack or read byte */
      if ( i )
      { 
        c = stack[--i];
      }
      else
      {
        if ( !size--)
        {
          break;
        }
        c = str_getc(input);
      }

      /* output byte or push pair on stack */
      if ( c == left[c] )
      {
        str_putc(c, output);
      }
      else
      {
        stack[i++] = right[c];
        stack[i++] = left[c];
      }
    }
  }
}


/* end of file */
share|improve this answer
    
this looks very promising, I will report back with the results later today! –  Lotzki Feb 4 '13 at 14:33
    
alright, @Lotzki, if you can give me a test string, and the expected output string, I can set up an IDEONE run for this program. –  Aniket Feb 4 '13 at 14:34
    
You should probably add a note that the global index variables needs to be reset if this function is to be used multiple times. And since this is supposed to be C++, you could pass the pointers by reference and modify them directly instead, thereby eliminating the need for the global indexes. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 4 '13 at 14:38
    
agreed @JoachimPileborg, you are free to edit the answer if you wish to. –  Aniket Feb 4 '13 at 14:49
1  
@Lotzki, the problem is with expand() function. I am debugging it to see what could be wrong –  Aniket Feb 4 '13 at 15:14

All C++ input streams have a get function that can be used to get one character at a time. And output streams have a corresponding put function.

Simply replace where needed.

Of course, the normal input and output operators >> and << can be used as well.


If you want to work on the arrays directly, that's easy as well, once you learn how to handle pointers. Then just pass the input and output arrays to the function, and when getting a byte use e.g. left[c] = *input++; and when writing use e.g. *output++ = c;.


You can also use a standard C++ container such as std::vector for storage of the data. In this case you use e.g. std::vector<char>, and use iterators to get and set single characters.


This is all actually very basic stuff, and things you should learn yourself quickly. Just read more about pointers, arrays, the C++ standard I/O functionality, and the standard containers

share|improve this answer
    
error compiling, void main, C++ does not allow void return type for main function. –  Aniket Feb 4 '13 at 14:14
    
@Aniket Yes, but it's unrelated to the question. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 4 '13 at 14:15
    
I know, i already changed it to int main and added return 0...then it works –  Lotzki Feb 4 '13 at 14:32

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