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I want to create a new column in a data.table calculated from the current value of one column and the previous of another. Is it possible to access previous rows?

E.g.:

> DT <- data.table(A=1:5, B=1:5*10, C=1:5*100)
> DT
   A  B   C
1: 1 10 100
2: 2 20 200
3: 3 30 300
4: 4 40 400
5: 5 50 500
> DT[, D := C + BPreviousRow] # What is the correct code here?

The correct answer should be

> DT
   A  B   C   D
1: 1 10 100  NA
2: 2 20 200 210
3: 3 30 300 320
4: 4 40 400 430
5: 5 50 500 540
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4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Old solution:

DT[, D := C + c(NA, B[1:(.N-1)])][]  # the last [] is to print the result

Edit:

# following nice point by @mnel in comments to use seq_len to avoid 1:0 issue
DT[, D := C + c(NA, B[seq_len(.N-1)])][]  # the last [] is to print the result

#    A  B   C   D
# 1: 1 10 100  NA
# 2: 2 20 200 210
# 3: 3 30 300 320
# 4: 4 40 400 430
# 5: 5 50 500 540
share|improve this answer
    
Does that .N hold the current row number or something? Sorry to ask here, but I can't seem to find it in the help files... –  SlowLearner Feb 4 '13 at 15:24
1  
From ?data.table (under by): .N is an integer, length 1, containing the number of rows in the group. –  Arun Feb 4 '13 at 15:25
    
Ah, thanks, missed that –  SlowLearner Feb 4 '13 at 15:29
4  
@SlowLearner: You might also find .I useful, which holds the row indices for the rows in the curren group. –  Steve Lianoglou Feb 4 '13 at 16:02
4  
Use seq_len(.N - 1) instead of 1:(.N-1). This avoids problems associated with 1:0. –  mnel Feb 4 '13 at 19:08

Based on @Steve Lianoglou 's comment above, why not just:

DT[, D:= C + c(NA, B[.I - 1]) ]
#    A  B   C   D
# 1: 1 10 100  NA
# 2: 2 20 200 210
# 3: 3 30 300 320
# 4: 4 40 400 430
# 5: 5 50 500 540

And avoid using seq_len or head or any other function.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice - however this would not work if you wanted to find the previous within a group. –  Matthew Sep 2 at 18:39

Following Arun's solution, a similar results can be obtained without referring to to .N

> DT[, D := C + c(NA, head(B, -1))][]
   A  B   C   D
1: 1 10 100  NA
2: 2 20 200 210
3: 3 30 300 320
4: 4 40 400 430
5: 5 50 500 540
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a reason to prefer one method to another? Or is it simply an aesthetic difference? –  Corone Feb 4 '13 at 16:10
    
I think that in this scenario (i.e. where .N is readily available) it is mostly aesthetic choice. I am not aware of any important difference. –  Ryogi Feb 4 '13 at 16:24

Several folks have answered the specific question. See the code below for a general purpose function that I use in situations like this that may be helpful. Rather than just getting the prior row, you can go as many rows in the "past" or "future" as you'd like.

rowShift <- function(x, shiftLen = 1L) {
  r <- (1L + shiftLen):(length(x) + shiftLen)
  r[r<1] <- NA
  return(x[r])
}

# Create column D by adding column C and the value from the previous row of column B:
DT[, D := C + rowShift(B,-1)]

# Get the Old Faithul eruption length from two events ago, and three events in the future:
as.data.table(faithful)[1:5,list(eruptLengthCurrent=eruptions,
                                 eruptLengthTwoPrior=rowShift(eruptions,-2), 
                                 eruptLengthThreeFuture=rowShift(eruptions,3))]
##   eruptLengthCurrent eruptLengthTwoPrior eruptLengthThreeFuture
##1:              3.600                  NA                  2.283
##2:              1.800                  NA                  4.533
##3:              3.333               3.600                     NA
##4:              2.283               1.800                     NA
##5:              4.533               3.333                     NA
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