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I would like to test FindPolicyToBeResent() in the following piece of code. I have a few options available but would like to know how anybody else would approach this situation also if my approach ie the last option is ok?

  • Make FindPolicyToBeResent() public. This not an option as it exposes an implementation for the sole reason of testing and makes interfaces confusing
  • Unit test using the public API only but this could be difficult as I never expose the collection that I am filtering directly in the return statement and cannot do so for security reasons. This would mean that I could only have limited tests
  • Usually I would break the code out into a new object in this situation but it doesn't feel right in this case, I cant foresee this filter being reused anywhere else in the system so it would be no better than making the method public and before anyone hits me with the single responsibility stick (which would be justified), coding is a balancing act, I feel like it would be breaking the Keep It Simple principle. It just feels like making a class to service the test rather than it actually having a seperate single responcibility. Plus it results in file and class bloat.
  • I could make the code an extension method of the IEnumerable which would make it testable but again I cant forsee this filter being used anywhere else so it would make more sense if it remained in this class
  • The last option and prefer but may be seen as a bit of a hack is test the mock of documentResenderRepository.CanPolicyBeResent(policy.Id) further down the code using verify() to see how many time it has bee hit. I am not sure if this is a good idea? Thoughts?

My preference is for the last option but it does feel a bit dirty, I have an example at the bottom

public class DocumentResendService : IDocumentResendService
{
    #region Member Variables
    ...
    #endregion


    #region Constructors
    ...
    #endregion


    #region Accessors
    ...
    #endregion

    #region Methods
    public IDocumentResendResponse ResendDocuments()
    {
        if (!IsInputsValid())
        {
            return response;
        }


        RecordRequestAttempt();

        if (RequestLimitIsReached())
        {
            return response;
        }


        FindPolicyToBeResent();


        if(PolicyCanNotBeResent())
        {
            return response;
        }

        RequestDocumentToBeResent();

        return response;
    }


    private bool IsInputsValid()
    {
        ..
    }


    private void RecordRequestAttempt()
    {
        ...
    }


    private bool RequestLimitIsReached()
    {
        ...
    }

    // I want to test this method which basically just filters the policies
    private void FindPolicyToBeResent()
    {
        var allPolicies = policyDocumentRepository.GetPolicy(AgentCode, Email, PostCode, SearchDate, BirthDate);

        policies = allPolicies.Where(currentPolicy => currentPolicy.IsActive() || currentPolicy.IsInTheFuture());

        if (policies.Count() == 0 )
        {
            policies = allPolicies.FilterToPolicyThatHasEndedMostRecently();          
        }
     }


    private bool PolicyCanNotBeResent()
    {
        if (policies == null || !policies.Any())
        {
            response.Add(ErrorCode.PolicyCanNotBeFound);

            return true;
        }

        foreach (var policy in policies)
        {
           // I could mock this line and use a verify here which policy id's are passed in
            if (documentResenderRepository.CanPolicyBeResent(policy.Id) == false)
            {
                response.Add(ErrorCode.UnableToResendDocument);
            }  
        }

        return response.Errors.Any();
    }


    private void RequestDocumentToBeResent()
    {
        ...
    }

    #endregion
}

Here is the unit test solution for the last option but

  [TestFixture]
    public class FindPolicyToBeResentTest : DocumentResenderTestsBase
    {
    private readonly List<Policy> allPolicies = new List<Policy>();

    public FindPolicyToBeResentTest()
    {
        var day = -250;

        for (int i = 1; i < 6; i++)
        {
            var policy = new Policy
            {
                Id = i,
                StartDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(day)
            };
            day = day + 100;
            policy.EndDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(day);
            allPolicies.Add(policy);
        }
    }

    private void SetUpDocumentResender(IEnumerable<Policy> policies)
    {


        SetUpObjectDefaultsForDocumentResenderCreation();

        policyRepositoryMock.Setup(y => y.GetPolicy(It.IsAny<string>(),
                                                    It.IsAny<string>(),
                                                    It.IsAny<string>(),
                                                    It.IsAny<DateTime>(),
                                                    It.IsAny<DateTime>()))
            .Returns(policies);


        documentResendService = CreateDocumentResendService();

        SetDocumentResenderDefaults();
    }


    [Test]
    public void PoliciesThatAreNotActiveOrAreInThePastShouldBeFilteredOut()
    {
        SetUpDocumentResender(allPolicies);

        documentResendService.ResendDocuments();

        foreach (var policy in allPolicies)
        {
            if (policy.IsActive() || policy.IsInTheFuture())
            {
                documentResenderRepositoryMock.Verify(x => x.CanPolicyBeResent(policy.Id), Times.AtLeastOnce());  
            }
            else
            {
                documentResenderRepositoryMock.Verify(x => x.CanPolicyBeResent(policy.Id), Times.Never());    
            }                
        }
    }

    [Test]
    public void IfNoPoliciesAreFoundThatAreSuitableForDocumentResendingThenGetThePolicyThatHasMostRecentlyExpired()
    {
        var unsuitablePolicies = allPolicies.Where(x => x.IsActive() == false && x.IsInTheFuture() == false).OrderBy(x =>x.EndDate);

        var policyWithClosestToEndDateToNow = unsuitablePolicies.ToList().Last();

        SetUpDocumentResender(unsuitablePolicies);

        documentResendService.ResendDocuments();

        documentResenderRepositoryMock.Verify(x => x.CanPolicyBeResent(policyWithClosestToEndDateToNow.Id), Times.AtLeastOnce());

        foreach (var policy in allPolicies.Where(policy => policy != policyWithClosestToEndDateToNow))
        {
            documentResenderRepositoryMock.Verify(x => x.CanPolicyBeResent(policy.Id), Times.Never());
        }
    }
}
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1  
We usually only unit test the public interface of our classes. Unit testing private methods does not seem particularly useful. They're implementation details. –  Ginosaji Feb 4 '13 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Testing private methods through a public method is fine. If your code is modular enough there shouldn't be too much setup code in order get the conditions correct to get into your private method. If you do find yourself setting up a lot of stuff just to get into your private method, chances are you're doing too much in one class.

In your case, I would be tempted to go with your point 3), and create a PolicyFinder : IPolicyFinder class. Maybe you don't need to re-use it right now, be it makes your code much easier to modify in the future and makes both classes easier to test

(See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_responsibility_principle)

edit: I didn't fully read your 3) bullet point, so sorry for hitting you with the single responsibility stick ;)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for hitting OP with the single responsibility stick. –  Ginosaji Feb 4 '13 at 15:30

You could mark the methods internal, rather than private, then use the InternalsVisibleTo attribute in your AssemblyInfo.cs file to allow the unit test assembly to access those internal methods. For example this statement in the AssemblyInfo file for my assembly OVReadySDK:

[assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("OVReadySDKUT, PublicKey=002400000480...5baacad")]

allows test methods in my unit test assembly, OVReadySDKUT, to access classes and methods in OVReadySDK as if the test methods were same assembly.

You can find quite a few examples of that technique by doing a search on "InternalsVisibleTo unit test." Note that if your assembly is signed, you will need to supply a public key argument in the InternalsVisibleTo statement.

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