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I have the follwoing method to return some data for me:

public List<Document> GetDocumentsList(Guid sessionID, bool includeValid, bool includeExpired, bool includeAboutToExpire)
{
   using (DB db = new DB())
   {
       // get the active documents
       var docs = db.Documents
                  .Where(d =>
                      db.EmployeeStatuses
                     .Any(s => s.EmpID == d.EmpID && s.StatusEndDate == null && s.Status == "Active")
                        );

        // how to filter the result depending on includeValid, includeExpired and includeAboutToExpired parameters?

        return docs.ToList()
    }
}

The problem here is, I want to filter the result depending on the bool parametes, for example if includeValid is true, then the valid documents will be included, if the includeExpired is true then the expired documents will be included and so on, I could have all three true or one or two of them are true. I do not want to have more than one call to the DB. Is there a logic that can do this with one call?

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4 Answers 4

what about something like this? (I'm making assumptions on how those flags are supposed to be evaluated of course).

public List<Document> GetDocumentsList(Guid sessionID, bool includeValid, bool includeExpired, bool includeAboutToExpire)
{
   using (DB db = new DB())
   {
       // get the active documents
       var docs = db.Documents
                  .Where(d =>
                      db.EmployeeStatuses
                     .Any(s => s.EmpID == d.EmpID 
                               && s.StatusEndDate == null 
                               && (s.Status == "Active"
                                 || (includeValid && s.Status == "Valid")
                                 || (includeExpired && s.Status == "Expired")
                                 || (includeAboutToExpired && s.Status == "AboutToExpired") ))
                        );

        // how to filter the result depending on includeValid, includeExpired and includeAboutToExpired parameters?

        return docs.ToList()
    }
}
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also, I believe the answer provided which uses multiple .Where is incorrect, as the implied result is that it is filtering out results, based on positive assertion of "includeValid" etc, when precisely the opposite is required. –  baldric Feb 5 '13 at 11:59

Looks like you need join of documents and statuses. Also condition (!includeValid || d.Valid) gives you filtering of valid documents only id includeValid is true:

public List<Document> GetDocumentsList(Guid sessionID, 
       bool includeValid, bool includeExpired, bool includeAboutToExpire)
{
   using (DB db = new DB())
   {
       // get the active documents
       var docs = from d in db.Documents
                  join s in db.EmployeeStatuses on d.EmpID equals s.EmpID
                  where s.StatusEndDate == null &&
                        s.Status == "Active" &&
                        (!includeValid || d.Valid) &&
                        (!includeExpired || d.Expired) &&
                        (!includeAboutToExpired || d.AboutToExpired)
                  select d;

        return docs.ToList()
    }
}
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You could use the PredicateBuilder implementation. With this class you can apply some filters on your linq queries. Something like this:

public IEnumerable<Document> GetDocumentsList(Guid? sessionID, bool? includeValid, bool? includeExpired, bool?  includeAboutToExpire)
{
    var query = db.Documents;

    if (sessionID.HasValue)
       query = query.And(x => x.SessionID = sessionID.Value);

    if (includeValid.HasValue && includeValid.Value)
       query = query.And(x => x.IncludeValid = includeValid.Value);

    // others parameters...

    return query.ToList();
}

PredicateBuilder implementation

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public static class PredicateBuilder
{
  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> True<T> ()  { return f => true;  }
  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> False<T> () { return f => false; }

  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Or<T> (this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1,
                                                      Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
  {
    var invokedExpr = Expression.Invoke (expr2, expr1.Parameters.Cast<Expression> ());
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>
          (Expression.OrElse (expr1.Body, invokedExpr), expr1.Parameters);
  }

  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> And<T> (this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1,
                                                       Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
  {
    var invokedExpr = Expression.Invoke (expr2, expr1.Parameters.Cast<Expression> ());
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>
          (Expression.AndAlso (expr1.Body, invokedExpr), expr1.Parameters);
  }
}
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I don't see how adding this class adds any benefit in comparison with my answer. –  HighCore Feb 4 '13 at 18:39
    
@HighCore - As long as it consists of ANDed conditions, I don't think it does. If the OP needs an OR (which he didn't say he did), then that's something you can't do with Where() clauses alone. –  Bobson Feb 4 '13 at 19:40
    
Just adding the Bosbson comment, PredicateBuilder is a generic famous implementation to extend lambda expressions in And/Or/Not logic operations to create dynamic expressions. You can use it as you need such as ORMs that support it, linq to objects, etc. –  Felipe Oriani Feb 4 '13 at 19:48

LinQ to entities defers execution until the results are enumerated. Therefore, adding subsequent .Where() statements is not going to cause multiple calls to the db

var docs = db.Documents
                  .Where(d =>
                      db.EmployeeStatuses
                     .Any(s => s.EmpID == d.EmpID && s.StatusEndDate == null && s.Status == "Active")
                        );

if (includeValid)
   docs = docs.Where(x => [condition]);

//... and so on.

return docs.ToList(); // <- This is where the query is actually executed. 
share|improve this answer
    
The inital docs list is having all documents already.. this will not help I already know this –  user915331 Feb 4 '13 at 16:08
2  
@HaLaBi The concept can be applied based on whatever the business logic is. If you need to include items that aren't currently in the set you could use Concat or Union to add additional items to the result set conditionally. It will all be compiled into a single query that does one DB round trip (you can easily look at the log files to confirm this). –  Servy Feb 4 '13 at 16:11
1  
@HaLaBi I don't understand what you mean. My answer is in fact correct and we have tested it many times over with Entity Framework 4.0 and inspecting execution of SQL via SSMS SQL Profiler. –  HighCore Feb 4 '13 at 16:12
    
@HaLaBi - As the other two said, this is correct. Yes, db.Documents, by itself, would return all documents, but the .Where() calls added to it return only a subset thereof. If you just "know" that it won't work, try it anyway. If you have tried it and it didn't work, post the code you tried. –  Bobson Feb 4 '13 at 18:32

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