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I have a class like so.

public class Step<T>
{
    public delegate void Act<T>();

    Act<T> _act;

    public Step(Act<T> action)
    {
        Contract.Requires(action != null);

        _act = action;
    }

    public void PerformStep()
    {
        _act.Invoke();
    }
}

My problem is as follows. I want the constructor of this class to be able to accept a delegate with the definition you see in the class. What I do not want is for that delegate to be a public member of my class. The alternative of this is to have a public delegate outside of the class but no other class but this one will need it. Is there a way I can make the delegate private?

If that solution is not possible is there an alternative? This step class is just a wrapper for delegates that are to be run sequentially. There is no need for a signature if I can have a more generic solution.

EDIT: More info for clarification.

The aim of this class it to be able to allow the user to do something like the following.

If I have a Class Car. This car will have methods like Drive, Stop, Turn etc. Using this Step Class the user of the Class should be able to create an instance of their class then do the following.

Car c = new Car();
Step<Car> step1 = new Step<Car>(c.TurnLeft);
Step<Car> step2 = new Step<Car>(c.Drive);
Step<Car> step3 = new Step<Car>(c.TurnRight);
//add steps to a collection
c.AddNewRoutine(collection of steps);
c.RunRoutine(identify which routine);

The steps will be added to a data structure that will allow them to be executed in order. The car class will contain a data structure that can hold these groups of steps. This then allows any class to be created and have the user set up steps for that class to take, without the class or main program having to hardcode the behaviour.

To finish. I need the step class to be as it is. I just do not want to allow public access to that delegate in any form as the only class who needs it is the Step class.

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5  
Why dont you use built-in Action<T> instead of defining new delegate? –  Cuong Le Feb 4 '13 at 16:35
1  
Why is the delegate Act<T> generic when it accepts no arguments and returns no value? –  Greg Feb 4 '13 at 16:38
2  
There is a version of System.Action that does not take any parameters. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.action.aspx –  p.s.w.g Feb 4 '13 at 16:41
1  
@Kazuo the problem with that is that if you change the Action<T> to a simple Action then it makes no sense for the whole Step class to be generic. You would also have to remove the <T> from the public class Step. –  HighCore Feb 4 '13 at 17:11
1  
Also, I think there's a little misconception in your approach. If you intend to create a list of steps, these should be Action<T>, and accept an instance of T as their parameter. Otherwise, you would end up with a list of actions that point to the methods in a specific instance, and these would not be reusable for another instance of say, Car –  HighCore Feb 4 '13 at 17:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Remove the delegate alltogether and use an Action:

private Action<T> _action;

public Step(Action<T> action)
{
   _action = action;
}

Edit:

you can also have a simple System.Action with no type parameters

private Action _action;

public Step(Action action)
{
   _action = action;
}

However, keep in mind that when doing this:

var c = new Car();
var step1 = new Step(c.TurnLeft);

your're tying the step1 to the actual instance c, you will not be able to reuse that step for another instance:

var c2 = new Car(); //There's no way to call step1 on this =(
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1  
Note that Act<T> has no parameters, unlike Action<T> –  Greg Feb 4 '13 at 16:39
1  
@Greg you're right, then he should use just a regular Action (with no type parameters) –  HighCore Feb 4 '13 at 16:41
    
@Greg Action<T> doesn't have a return value either. I think you mean Act<T> doesn't have any parameters, unlike Action<T> –  juharr Feb 4 '13 at 16:41
    
@juharr is correct –  Greg Feb 4 '13 at 16:42
    
@Greg you're right, however, I think the whole purpose of the Step class in the question is to be able to execute actions on some objects, therefore he should find a way to have an Action<T> and call it with some parameters –  HighCore Feb 4 '13 at 16:44

If other classes need to use the delegate then you need to make it public. Period.

Your only real option is to add a constructor that accepts some other kind of paramter(s) that the constructor can then turn into that delegate type.

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No other class needs access to the delegate. Just the class in the question –  Kazuo Feb 4 '13 at 16:36
    
But you just said the constructor accepts the delegate as a parameter. How can other classes create an instance of this class if they can't call the constructor? –  itsme86 Feb 4 '13 at 16:36
    
They can create an instance of the class using the constructor and all they must do is pass in a method matching the signature of the delegate. They do not need access to the delegate itself in my class. –  Kazuo Feb 4 '13 at 16:39
    
If they need to pass in an argument of type X then you'll need to expose type X to them. There's no getting around that. Hopefully you're not confusing exposing the type of X to them and exposing the instance of X to them. The delegate definition is just the type. You can still encapsulate the passed-in value of that type. –  itsme86 Feb 4 '13 at 16:41
    
The type they are passing in is themselves as shown in the question. Car c = new Car(); Step<Car> step1 = new Step<Car>(c.TurnLeft); They do not need to have access to the delegate in my example. –  Kazuo Feb 4 '13 at 17:00

Your example uses a custom delegate that takes no parameters and has no return value. For this the System.Action may be ideal. If your custom delegate needs to supply a return value, use System.Func instead.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.action.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb534960.aspx

From the sample you provided it looks like what you want is something more like this:

public class Step<T>
{
    Action _action;

    public Step(Action action)
    {
        Contract.Requires(action != null);

        _action = action;
    }

    public void PerformStep()
    {
        _action.Invoke();
    }
}
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