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I know that object which is assigned to the reference variable whose type is an interface could be an instance of a class that implements the interface. But for the following code blocks:

public interface foo {
    public abstract void method_1();
}

class bar implements foo {  
    @Overide
    public void method_1() { //Implementation... }

    public void method_2() { //Do some thing... } 
}
.....

foo variable = new bar();
variable.method_1(); // OK;
variable.method_2(); // Is it legal?

Is it possible to make the variable (whose declared type is foo but actual type is bar) call the method_2 which is not declared in the interface ? Thanks in advance!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you can cast:

((bar)variable).method_2();

But you probably shouldn't. The whole point of an interface is to only use the methods it provides. If they're not sufficient, then don't use the interface.

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variable.method_2() won't compile as variable is of type foo. foo does not have a method method_2().

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No, it is not. If you want access to method_2, you have to declare the type of variable to be bar.

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Is it possible to make the variable (whose declared type is foo but actual type is bar) call the method_2 which is not declared in the interface ?

Not its not possible. It will be a compile time error.

There is other standard deviation also in your code

  1. Interface and class names should be in upper camel case (this is UpperCamelCase).
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Yes, you're right. Thank you for pointing it out! –  Dreamer Feb 6 '13 at 1:01

No, it is not legal. However, you can inspect the type at runtime and cast to the correct type:

if (variable instanceof bar) ((bar)variable).method_2();

(Strictly speaking you can cast without the instanceof check if you know for sure the type is correct, or are happy to get an exception thrown if you are wrong.)

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