Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Firs of all, sorry if my english is not absolutely correct. It's not my native language but I'll try to explain myself the best I can.

I'm having a hard time trying to understand the following issue. Take in account the following code:

// On a class named SPOTest
- (void)referenceTest:(NSMutableString *)originalText
{
    [originalText appendString:@" world!!!"]
}

// From another place
NSMutableString *myText = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@"Hello"];
NSLog(@"Contents of myText BEFORE: %@", myText);
SPOTest *myTest = [[SPOTest alloc] init];
[myTest referenceTest:myText];
NSLog(@"Contents of myText AFTER: %@", myText);

The output:

Contents of myText BEFORE: Hello
Contents of myText AFTER: Hello world!!!

I find it understandable. I'm working with pointers so if I change the thing and the end of a pointer, I'm changing that thing for all the pointers pointing to it. On the other hand, if I change the code and do this:

// On a class named SPOTest
- (void)referenceTest:(NSMutableString *)originalText
{
    NSMutableString *newText = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@"Hello world!!!"];
    originalText = newText;
}

// From another place
NSMutableString *myText = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@"Hello"];
NSLog(@"Contents of myText BEFORE: %@", myText);
SPOTest *myTest = [[SPOTest alloc] init];
[myTest referenceTest:myText];
NSLog(@"Contents of myText AFTER: %@", myText);

Then I get this:

Contents of myText BEFORE: Hello
Contents of myText AFTER: Hello

Why is that? I suppose the correct way to do this is to use a double indirection and an implementation similar to the one used with NSError mechanism but I want to understand why I'm obtaining this behavior. If I can change the contents and the end of myText pointer from the referenceTest: method in the first example, why can't I change the address of myText from the same method in the second example?

I know I'm missing something trivial but I can't find it and I'd like to understand this to better understand the reasoning behind NSError mechanism.

Thank you!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the second case you're changing the local copy of that pointer. If you want to repoint it in the calling scope, you'd need to use a pointer to a pointer, i.e.:

- (void)referenceTest:(NSMutableString **)originalText
{
    NSMutableString *newText = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@"Hello world!!!"];
    *originalText = newText;
}

And call it thusly:

[myTest referenceTest:&myText];

And it is worth noting that stringWithString returns an autoreleased string, which means your function is too.

share|improve this answer
    
Or better still, return the new string. –  trojanfoe Feb 4 '13 at 17:32
    
Got it! Thank you! –  Sendoa Feb 4 '13 at 19:06

There's a difference between objects and pointers to objects.

Someone has created an NSMutableString object, which exists somewhere in memory. We don't really care where it is. That someone received an NSMutableString* which points to the NSMutableString object. A copy of that NSMutableString* was given to your method referenceTest. There can be any number of pointers to that NSMutableString object, but there is only one object.

The appendString method changes the NSMutableString object itself.

The stringWithString method creates a new NSMutableString object and returns a pointer to it. So now we have two objects, and newText is a pointer to the second one. When you assign newText to originalText, originalText becomes a pointer to the second NSMutableString object. However, originalText is just the parameter in your method. The pointer that the calling method holds isn't changed by this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.