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In the haskell functonal dependency wiki:

Given these definitions:

data Vector = Vector Int Int deriving (Eq, Show)
data Matrix = Matrix Vector Vector deriving (Eq, Show)
instance Num Vector where
  Vector a1 b1 + Vector a2 b2 = Vector (a1+a2) (b1+b2)
  Vector a1 b1 - Vector a2 b2 = Vector (a1-a2) (b1-b2)
  {- ... and so on ... -}

instance Num Matrix where
  Matrix a1 b1 + Matrix a2 b2 = Matrix (a1+a2) (b1+b2)
  Matrix a1 b1 - Matrix a2 b2 = Matrix (a1-a2) (b1-b2)
  {- ... and so on ... -}
class Mult a b c where
  (*) :: a -> b -> c

instance Mult Matrix Matrix Matrix where
  {- ... -}

instance Mult Matrix Vector Vector where
  {- ... -}

I cannot understand why there is ambiguous type for:

m1, m2, m3 :: Matrix
(m1 * m2) * m3              -- type error; type of (m1*m2) is ambiguous

Obviously, when m1 and m2 are Matrix, the only possible type of the return is Matrix, i.e. applying the instance Mult Matrix Matrix Matrix.

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Only m3 is defined as of Matrix type. m1 and m2 can be any type that satisfies type for the left side (result of parens) of multiplication with m3. –  David Unric Feb 4 '13 at 17:31
3  
Open-world assumption. What would happen if there was instance Mult Matrix Matrix Vector somewhere else? Based on what will you choose the instance which makes sense? –  is7s Feb 4 '13 at 17:39

2 Answers 2

The problem is with the type class declaration

class Mult a b c where
  (*) :: a -> b -> c

By applying (*) on two arguments, you have no way how to determine the type of the result. Suppose you have two instances:

instance Mult Int Int Int where ...
instance Mult Int Int Integer where ...

Then 2 * 4 could be of type Int as well as of Integer.

Now you can argue that you have only one instance and so the compiler shouldn't complain. But Haskell type classes live in an open-world. You can always add more instances, and it must not break code elsewhere. So even if you had only one instance, someone else in another library could add another one. And, you'd have two libraries, each working, but failing together. This would be clearly incorect. See Living in an open world in Real World Haskell.

So generally the return types of a function in a type class must be derivable from its arguments. This is exactly what functional dependencies are for. If you declare

class Mult a b c | a b -> c where

then the compiler can always tell what is the return type of (*).

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Because you forgot all the other possibilities, e.g.

 instance Mult Matrix Matrix Vector where
 instance Mult Vector Matrix Vector where
 instance Mult Float Matrix Float where
 instance Mult Matrix Matrix Float where  -- etc.

 a :: Vector
 a = (m1 >< m2:: Vector) >< m3

 b :: Float
 b = (m1 >< m2:: Float) >< m3

Adding a functional dependency to the class definition:

instance Mult a b c | a b -> c

would mean that

instance Mult Matrix Matrix Matrix

decides the matter for two matrices and that

instance Mult Matrix Matrix Vector
instance Mult Matrix Matrix Float

are excluded, since they give another way of viewing a 'product of a Matrix and a Matrix.' So the state of affairs you are finding intuitive is the one you would get with the functional dependency.

If the functional dependency were formulated so:

 instance Mult a b c | b -> a c

this would also permit the two instances you state,

 instance Mult Matrix Matrix Matrix where
 instance Mult Matrix Vector Vector where

but exclude the others I imagined, which all have Matrix in the b position (as they had to, since in the ambigous example m3 was explained as a Matrix and not as the result of a product of matrices.

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