Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The database has data in UTC and when I try to get data

java.util.Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
java.sql.Timestamp ts = resultSet.getTimestamp(PUBLISH_TIME);
cal.setTime(ts);

Is there anything wrong with this?

share|improve this question
2  
You tell us, you're the one asking the question. Have you actually tried it? Does it not give results that you were expecting? If yes, then what were you expecting, and what were the results that it gave? And what does the database tell you when you use its own query tool? –  kdgregory Sep 24 '09 at 1:27
    
Yes I tried it, yes it is not giving the results that I am expecting. The database has UTC value and this code further add +8 to the already existing value in DB. –  kal Sep 24 '09 at 1:48
    
I mean +8 Hours –  kal Sep 24 '09 at 1:49
    
What is the DB? Have you tried with other DB? do you know resultSet.getTimestamp(PUBLISH_TIME,Calendar.getInstance()); possible? –  Mohan Apr 6 '10 at 11:55
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your DateFormat instance is most likely displaying the value in local time. When displaying your value, give this a try:

java.util.Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
java.sql.Timestamp ts = resultSet.getTimestamp(PUBLISH_TIME);
cal.setTime(ts);

SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss z");
sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
System.out.println(cal.getTime());

EDIT: to your comment:

What if I use GMT, would that be an issue in SimpleDateFormat

SimpleDateFormat can use general timezones (GMT +/- n), RFC822, and text ("if they have names" as the JavaDoc states - see this post for info on the names).

share|improve this answer
    
What if I use GMT, would that be an issue in SimpleDateFormat –  kal Sep 24 '09 at 8:49
    
see my edits in the post. –  akf Sep 24 '09 at 12:59
add comment
java.util.Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(); 
cal.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")); 
java.sql.Timestamp ts = resultSet.getTimestamp(PUBLISH_TIME, cal); 

This should do the trick!

share|improve this answer
    
this should be marked as the correct answer ;) –  Kirby Jul 27 '12 at 16:11
    
Note that as per the documenation at docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/sql/… this will work only if the underlying database does not store timestamp information –  arahant Mar 5 '13 at 14:16
    
@arahant, if the underlying db stores timezone (not timestamp) information then there's no problem as the timestamp will be in the correct timezone. The problem is when the timestamp is stored in UTC without timezone information, as Java will use the local machine's timezone to construct the timestamp object. –  Paul Mar 11 '13 at 15:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.