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Sorry for this apparently simple question, but spent too long trying to find the solution everywhere and trying different sed options. I just need to replace all dots by commas in a text file, but just between two positions. As an example, from:

1.3.5.7.9

to

1.3,5,7.9

So, replace . by , between positions 3 to 7. Thanks!

EDITED: sorry, I pretended to simplify the problem, but as none of the first 3 answers work due to a lack of details in my question, let me go a bit deeper. The important point is replacing all dots by comas in an interval of positions without knowing the rest of the string:

Here some text. I don't want to change. 10.000 usd  234.566 usd Continuation text.
More text. No need to change this part.    345 usd   76.433 usd Text going on. So on.

This is a fixed width text file, in columns, and I need to change the international format of numbers, replacing dots by commas. I just know the initial and final positions where I need to search and eventually replace the dots. Obviously, not all figures have dots (only those over 1000). Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

Rewriting the answer after the clarification of the question:

This is hard to handle with sed only, but can be simplified with other standard utilities like cut and paste:

$ start=40
$ end=64
$ paste -d' ' <(cut -c -$((start-1)) example.txt) \
> <(cut -c $((start+1))-$((end-1)) example.txt | sed 'y/./,/') \
> <(cut -c $((end+1))- example.txt)
Here some text. I don't want to change. 10,000 usd  234,566 usd Continuation text.
More text. No need to change this part.    345 usd   76,433 usd Text going on. So on.

(> just mean continuation of the previous line. < are real). This of course is very inefficient, but conceptually simple.

I used all the +1 and -1 stuff to get rid of extra spaces. Not sure if you need it.

A pure sed solution (brace yourself):

$ sed "s/\(.\{${start}\}\)\(.\{$((end-start))\}\)/\1\n\2\n/;h;s/.*\n\(.*\)\n.*/\1/;y/./,/;G;s/^\(.*\)\n\(.*\)\n\(.*\)\n\(.*\)$/\2\1\4/" example.txt
Here some text. I don't want to change. 10,000 usd  234,566 usd Continuation text.
More text. No need to change this part.    345 usd   76,433 usd Text going on. So on.

GNU sed:

$ sed -r "s/(.{${start}})(.{$((end-start))})/\1\n\2\n/;h;s/.*\n(.*)\n.*/\1/;y/./,/;G;s/^(.*)\n(.*)\n(.*)\n(.*)$/\2\1\4/" example.txt 
Here some text. I don't want to change. 10,000 usd  234,566 usd Continuation text.
More text. No need to change this part.    345 usd   76,433 usd Text going on. So on.
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Sory, hope the question is a bit clearer now. –  jm_ Feb 4 '13 at 22:07
    
@jm_ I changed the answer according to the clarified question. –  Lev Levitsky Feb 5 '13 at 21:51
    
Definitely, sed is not always the simpler solution! Thanks for your writing. Will be adding below what I found as more convenient... –  jm_ Feb 6 '13 at 9:07


I try to simplify the regex, but it more permissive.

echo 1.3.5.7.9 | sed -r "s/^(...).(.).(..)/\1,\2,\3/"
1.3,5,7.9

PS: It doesn't work with BSD sed.

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$ echo "1.3.5.7.9" |
gawk -v s=3 -v e=7 '{
   print substr($0,1,s-1) gensub(/\./,",","g",substr($0,s,e-s+1)) substr($0,e+1)
}'
1.3,5,7.9
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This is rather awkward to do in pure sed. If you're not strictly constrained to sed, I suggest using another tool to do this. Ed Morton's gawk-based solution is probably the least-awkward (no pun intended) way to solve this.

Here's an example of using sed to do the grunt work, but wrapped in a bash function for simplicity:

function transform () {
    line=$1
    start=$2
    end=$3
    # Save beginning and end of line
    front=$(echo $line | sed -e "s/\(^.\{$start\}\).*$/\1/")
    back=$(echo $line | sed -e "s/^.\{$end\}//")
    # Translate characters
    line=$(echo $line | sed -e 'y/\./,/')
    # Restore unmodified beginning/end
    echo $line | sed -e "s/^.\{$start\}/$front/" -e "s/\(^.\{$end\}\).*$/\1$back/"
}

Call this function like:

$ transform "1.3.5.7.9" 3 7
1.3,5,7.9
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Thank you all. What I found around (not my merit) as simple solutions are:

  1. For fixed width files:

    awk -F "" 'OFS="";{for (j=2;j<= 5;j++) if ($j==".") $j=","}'1
    

Will change all dots into commas from the 2nd position to the 5th.

  1. For tab delimited fields files:

    awk -F'\t' 'OFS="\t" {for (j=2;j<=5;j++) gsub(/\./,",",$j)}'1
    

Will change all dots into comas from the 2nd field to the 5th.

Hope that can help someone: couldn't imagine it would be so tough in the begining.

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