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I know the UTF-16 has two types of endiannesses: big endian and little endian.

Does the C++ standard define the endianness of std::wstring? or it is implementation-defined?

If it is standard-defined, which page of the C++ standard provide the rules on this issue?

If it is implementation-defined, how to determine it? e.g. under VC++. Does the compiler guarantee the endianness of std::wstring is strictly dependent on the processor?

I have to know this; because I want to send the UTF-16 string to others. I must add the correct BOM in the beginning of the UTF-16 string to indicate its endianness.

In short: Given a std::wstring, how should I reliably determine its endianness?

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The standard doesn't even specify how big a wchar_t is, it's not going to give an endianness. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 4 '13 at 18:30
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Why do you need to know this? Endianness is mostly architecture-dependent. –  EarlGray Feb 4 '13 at 18:33
    
@EalGray, I have to know this, because I want to send the UTF-16 string to others. I must add the correct BOM in the beginning. –  xmllmx Feb 4 '13 at 18:38
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wstring is totally implementation defined... If you are into communication with others, it would be kind of you to use UTF-8 instead, which does not suffer from all kind of these problems. –  ybungalobill Feb 4 '13 at 18:49
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@xmllmx: 1) you don't need to know the endianess if it is already in memory. Just like you don't care for the endianess of your ints when you sum them. A wchar_t that equals 0x0123 represents the codepoint U+0123 on any platform that uses UTF-16 for wchar_t strings. 2) "compiler filled characters"? Do you mean a "string literal"? Then how about using a UTF-8 string literal, available as u8"🐨" in C++11 or as simply as "🐨" with some compiler trickery on other compilers (described in the link)? –  ybungalobill Feb 4 '13 at 19:17
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Endianess is MACHINE dependent, not language dependent. Endianess is defined by the processor and how it arranges data in and out of memory. When dealing with wchar_t (which is wider than a single byte), the processor itself upon a read or write aligns the multiple bytes as it needs to in order to read or write it back to RAM again. Code simply looks at it as the 16 bit (or larger) word as represented in a processor internal register.

For determining (if that is really what you want to do) endianess (on your own), you could try writing a KNOWN 32 bit (unsigned int) value out to ram, then read it back using a char pointer. Look for the ordering that is returned.

It would look something like this:

unsigned int aVal = 0x11223344;
char * myValReadBack = (char *)(&aVal);

if(*myValReadBack == 0x11) printf("Big endian\r\n");
else                       printf("Little endian\r\n");

Im sure there are other ways, but something like the above should work, check my little versus big though :-)

Further, until Windows RT, VC++ really only compiled to intel type processors. They really only have had 1 endianess type.

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Thanks. Which page of MSDN specifies "VC++ really only compiled to intel type processors. They really only have had 1 endianess type."? –  xmllmx Feb 4 '13 at 18:49
    
@xmllmx - there is no MSDN that will say that. It is my own conclusion. VC++ is Microsofts C++ compiler. Windows has only until Windows 8 RT existed on X86 processors. X86 Processors have ALWAYS been Little Endian. Look here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness. Now IF YOU ARE SENDING TO or RECEIVING FROM a big endian machine, you may have to convert to / from, but if all you are trying to do is understand your own internal machine' endian type, this doesnt even need code, you should just be able to know that (in your case "little endian") –  trumpetlicks Feb 4 '13 at 18:52
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@trumpetlicks Windows has existed for non-x86 platforms (such as PPC) long before Windows RT, and Visual C++ existed for it as well. However, I do recall reading it has never been anything other than little-endian. Some processors do support both big- and little-endian mode, but Windows requires those processors to run in little-endian mode. –  hvd Feb 4 '13 at 20:36
    
@hvd I thought you might be wrong but Wikipedia agrees with you: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Mark Ransom Feb 4 '13 at 20:40
    
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It is implementation-defined. wstring is just a string of wchar_t, and that can be any byte ordering, or for that matter, any old size.

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If it is implementation-defined, then how to determine it? e.g. under VC++. –  xmllmx Feb 4 '13 at 18:31
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It will contain whatever you put in it. On VC++, wchar_t is 16-bits, and if you get your strings from the WinAPI, they will have the native hardware byte order. –  bmargulies Feb 4 '13 at 18:51
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wchar_t is not required to be UTF-16 internally and UTF-16 endianness does not affect how wchar's are stored, it's a matter of saving and reading it.

You have to use an explicit procedure of converting wstring to a UTF-16 bytestream before sending it anywhere. Internal endianness of wchar is architecture-dependent and it's better to use some opaque interfaces for converting than try to convert it manually.

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Does the compiler guarantee the endianness of std::wstring is strictly dependent on the processor? –  xmllmx Feb 4 '13 at 18:44
    
@xmllmx no, it does not. That's why I recommend not messing with internals of wstring and using some standard interface to convert it correctly. –  EarlGray Feb 4 '13 at 18:49
    
The problem remains unsolved. Given a std::wstring, how should I reliably determine its endianness? –  xmllmx Feb 4 '13 at 18:51
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For the purposes of sending the correct BOM, you don't need to know the endianness. Just use the code \uFEFF. That will be bigendian or little-endian depending on the endianness of your implementation. You don't even need to know whether your implementation is UTF-16 or UTF-32. As long as it is some unicode encoding, you'll end up with the appropriate BOM.

Unfortunately, neither wchars nor wide streams are guaranteed to be unicode.

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