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I am trying to watch my model value from inside my linking function.

scope.$watch(attrs.ngModel, function() {
       console.log("Changed"); 
    });

When I change the model value inside my controller, the $watch function is not triggered.

$scope.myModel = "ACT";

$timeout(function() {
   $scope.myModel = "TOTALS"; 
}, 2000);

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/dkrotts/BtrZH/4/

What am I missing here?

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FYI, the reason that watching attrs.ngModel worked over here is because the directive was not creating a new scope. In this question, your directive is creating an isolate scope, so you need to watch something in that isolate scope. –  Mark Rajcok Feb 4 '13 at 20:18
    
... or you could just watch the model value and not worry about who's scope is what. :P haha. –  Ben Lesh Feb 4 '13 at 20:31
1  
@blesh, I'm actively reading around trying to determine if I like your solution better than what dnc253 provided. I have to say that I'm not keen on having to require: ngModel and write a function in the $watch, vs just $watch('model', .... +1 for both of you though. –  Mark Rajcok Feb 4 '13 at 20:55
    
@MarkRajcok Haha... it really doesn't matter. The most important thing is that it works and is maintainable. dnc's solution was perfectly fine, and I might use his in a lot of cases. However, if someone comes here actively looking for a solution for how to watch the modelValue specifically on ngModel (which is what the title of the question reads like), I wanted to provide that answer for them. –  Ben Lesh Feb 4 '13 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The problem is that you $watching attrs.ngModel which is equal to "myModel". You do not have "myModel" bound in your scope. You want to $watch "model". That is what is bound in the scope of your directive. See http://jsfiddle.net/BtrZH/5/

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You'll need to watch a function that returns the $modelValue you're watching.

The following code shows a basic example:

app.directive('myDirective', function (){
    return {
        require: 'ngModel',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {
           scope.$watch(function () {
              return ngModel.$modelValue;
           }, function(newValue) {
               console.log(newValue);
           });
        }
     };
});

Here's a plunker of the same idea in action.

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I wasn't able to get this working. Fiddle: jsfiddle.net/dkrotts/dRxA4/1 –  Dustin Feb 4 '13 at 18:38
    
Yeah, that's weird... anyhow, I've completely changed my answer because $formatters weren't working as I would expect. You can $watch a function that returns a value, and have that value be the ngModel's $modelValue. –  Ben Lesh Feb 4 '13 at 19:00
1  
+1 for your answer as well. Both answers really are correct. Mine provided a solution to the specific problem linked in the question, whereas yours provides a general solution for those looking for a way to $watch what is specified in ngModel. –  dnc253 Feb 4 '13 at 21:45
    
If I try using an isolate scope with this solution, it only works if I use scope: { name: '=ngModel' }. If I try to use a different isolate scope property name -- e.g., scope: { model: '=ngModel' } -- it doesn't work!? Maybe when the ngModelController first runs it somehow knows about the name in the HTML/view?? –  Mark Rajcok Feb 9 '13 at 23:36
1  
Here's a fiddle that shows what happens if you use a different name in the object hash than what ng-model uses in the HTML. See also stackoverflow.com/a/14792601 –  Mark Rajcok Feb 11 '13 at 18:22

Here is another way to do this:

app.directive('myDirective', function (){
    return {
        require: 'ngModel',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {
           attrs.$observe('ngModel', function(value){ // Got ng-model bind path here
              scope.$watch(value,function(newValue){ // Watch given path for changes
                  console.log(newValue);  
              });
           });
        }
    };
});

Doing it that way you will be able to listen value changes with binds like that

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