Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What would this block look like using if/else statements instead of the ternary?

return value == null ? name.local ? attrNullNS : attrNull : typeof value === "function" ? name.local ? attrFunctionNS : attrFunction : name.local ? attrConstantNS : attrConstant;

(I want to be certain that I do this right before tackling another 15 similar blocks ... Ideally I'd like to replace all such blocks with a regexp, but there seems to be no method? Replace conditional operator with if/else automatically?)

share|improve this question
1  
Developer who left this code was kind of asshole.. –  dfsq Feb 4 '13 at 18:38

3 Answers 3

Good question.

First of all, I agree that the developer who left you with this code should be LARTed.

However, you can figure this out (without code formatters such as in Eclipse JSDT) if you consider that the syntax for the Conditional Operator is LogicalORExpression ? AssignmentExpression : AssignmentExpression or … : AssignmentExpressionNoIn and that the longest possible match wins.

Adjacent expressions that belong to the same atomic conditional operation cannot be delimited by either ?s or :s on both sides because the grammar does not allow that. So just put yourself into the position of a LL(n) parser that works according to the ECMAScript grammar ;-) Repeatedly ask yourself the question “Can this code be produced by the production for that goal symbol?”; if the answer is “no”, backtrack to the shorter match until it can, or fail with a syntax error if no production works.

  1. return (value == null ? name.local ? attrNullNS : attrNull : typeof value === "function" ? name.local ? attrFunctionNS : attrFunction : name.local ? attrConstantNS : attrConstant);
  2. return (value == null ? (name.local ? attrNullNS : attrNull ) : (typeof value === "function" ? name.local ? attrFunctionNS : attrFunction : name.local ? attrConstantNS : attrConstant));
  3. return ((value == null) ? (name.local ? attrNullNS : attrNull) : ( (typeof value === "function") ? (name.local ? attrFunctionNS : attrFunction) : (name.local ? attrConstantNS : attrConstant)));

And so:

if (value == null)
{
  if (name.local)
  {
    return attrNullNS;
  }
  else
  {
    return attrNull;
  }
}
else
{
  if (typeof value === "function")
  {
    if (name.local)
    {
      return attrFunctionNS;
    }
    else
    {
      return attrFunction;
    }
  }
  else
  {
    if (name.local)
    {
      return attrConstantNS;
    }
    else
    {
      return attrConstant;
    }
  }
}

(CMIIW.) This can be further reduced to

if (value == null)
{
  if (name.local)
  {
    return attrNullNS;
  }

  return attrNull;
}

if (typeof value === "function")
{
  if (name.local)
  {
    return attrFunctionNS;
  }

  return attrFunction;
}

if (name.local)
{
  return attrConstantNS;
}

return attrConstant;
share|improve this answer

Did this really fast by just replacing the ternary operators, but I'm guessing it would look a lot like this:

if (value == null) {
    if (name.local) {
        return attrNullNS;
    }else{
        return attrNull;
    }
}else if (typeof value === "function") {
    if (name.local) {
        return attrFunctionNS;
    }else{
        return attrFunction;
    }
}else{
    if (name.local) {
        return attrConstantNS;
    }else{
        return attrConstant;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The syntax ("grouping") of ternary operators and blockless if-else-statements are quite similar, so you could start by replacing each … ? with if (…) and each : with else. Then wrap the return statement around each, and use auto-indentation. Maybe you can even do some of these tasks carefully (step-by-step) with an auto-replace. You'll end up with

if (value == null)
    if (name.local) 
        return attrNullNS;
    else
        return attrNull;
else if (typeof value === "function")
    if (name.local)
        return attrFunctionNS;
    else
        return attrFunction;
else if (name.local)
    return attrConstantNS;
else
    return attrConstant;
share|improve this answer
    
Hopefully they will end up with something that contains braces. –  PointedEars Feb 4 '13 at 20:07
    
@PointedEars: If you think they improve readability, your auto-indentation should be able to add them. I omitted them on purpose to show my point that braceless conditional statements are very like braceless ternary operators. –  Bergi Feb 4 '13 at 20:14
    
What are you talking about? Auto-indentation alone cannot automatically add braces. More important than readability is maintainability. This code will start to fail the moment there is not only one statement dependent on the conditional expression. –  PointedEars Feb 4 '13 at 20:17
    
@PointedEars: OK, not the indentation alone but the tidy-up/pretty-print/whatever feature of your editor. And of course there is only one statement allowed in a if-else, but since the original ternary operator has the same limitation this is not a problem here - for the conversion. If you need to modify the code later braces might be useful, that's clear. –  Bergi Feb 4 '13 at 20:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.