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I think following is related to precision of float values somehow, but I'm not sure how and why exactly following behavior is observed. I have following piece of code in java:

class float_int
{
    void float_to_int(float val)
    {
        int int_val = (int)val;
        float remain_val = val - (float)int_val;
        System.out.println("val - " + val);
        System.out.println("int_val - " + (float)int_val);
        System.out.println("remain_val - " + remain_val);
    }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        float_int obj = new float_int();
        obj.float_to_int((float)12.345);
    }
}

I get the following output:

val - 12.345
int_val - 12.0
remain_val - 0.34500027

Now I'm not sure why I'm getting an extra "27" at the end for remain_val.

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I suggest using double unless you have a very good reason. You will still see these issues but they will be about one billion times smaller. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 4 '13 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because neither 12.345 nor 0.345 is exactly representable in binary floating-point.

For example:

float f = 12.345f;
System.out.printf("%.15f\n", f);  // Displays 12.345000267028809

In the above code, 12.345000267028809 is the nearest value that is exactly representable.

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Any reason why "27" or is it just random? –  pkumar Feb 4 '13 at 18:35
    
@pkumar.. Just try to convert 0.345 to base 2, and you will get to know. Time to take out a pen and paper. Don't just believe any stranger. –  Rohit Jain Feb 4 '13 at 18:36
    
@pkumar. And once you convert to base 2 successfully, it would be time to go through - floating-point tag wiki on SO. –  Rohit Jain Feb 4 '13 at 18:38

You're correct, it is because floats are not precise.

If you want your float to be represented correctly, you can use the same approach that this guy seemed to take: http://floating-point-gui.de/languages/java/

Which is to round the float:

String.format("%.2f", 1.2399) // returns "1.24"
String.format("%.3f", 1.2399) // returns "1.240"
String.format("%.2f", 1.2) // returns "1.20"
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Depends on your definition of "precise"... –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 4 '13 at 18:33

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