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In my previous question I got an answer hot to inject dependencies and while I tested it, everything worked well. Then I refactored the code and wanted to start the app implementation, but the injections stopped to work :( http://jsbin.com/alemik/1/edit

In addittion to jsbin, here is the source:

var ABCS = angular.module("ABCS", []);
ABCS.Configuration = angular.module('ABCS.Configuration', []);
ABCS.Controllers = angular.module('ABCS.Controllers', []);
ABCS.Modules = angular.module("ABCS.Modules", []);
ABCS.Services = angular.module("ABCS.Services", []);

ABCS.run(["$rootScope", "$location", "ABCS.Services.LogService",
         function ($rootScope, $location, logger) {
             logger.log("app start");
         }]);

ABCS.Configuration.factory("Environment", function () {
    return {
        logOutputElementId: "output",
        hasConsole: console && console.log
    }
});

//Log service
ABCS.Services.LogService = function (config) {
    this.log = function (message) {
        if (typeof (config.Environment.logOutputElementId) === "string") {
            document.getElementById(config.Environment.logOutputElementId).innerHTML += message + "<br/>";
        }
        else if (config.Environment.hasConsole) {
            console.log(message);
        }
        else {
            alert(message);
        }
    };
};
ABCS.Services.LogService.$inject = ["ABCS.Configuration"];
ABCS.Services.factory("ABCS.Services.LogService", ABCS.Services.LogService);

What I miss? Why ABCS.Services.LogService can not be injected in current structure.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
all that namespacing is totally unecessary since you can use angular module definition to namespace your code already. Furthermore it makes your code less modular when you need to split it into multiple files. You only need one variable per module/file,in fact you dont need variables at all. since angular is a DI container. –  mpm Feb 4 '13 at 19:10
    
I tried to do it work without variables to, but all my tries failed :( And I would prefer to keep the namespacing because of code organizing and name collisions. –  Alex Dn Feb 4 '13 at 19:13
    
But with a DI container there is no namespace collision ! unless you define 2 services with the same name in the same module. –  mpm Feb 4 '13 at 19:15
    
I'm trying to create a working guide for my DevTeam (10 ppl), application will have hundreds of files with different modules, controllers etc...so if I will keep methods in global scope, there big chance that someone can break it by defining/overriding same object. –  Alex Dn Feb 4 '13 at 19:21
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In my opinion , that's the angularJS way of doing things ( though i kept all the DI definitions ):

angular.module("ABCS", ['ABCS.Services', 'ABCS.Configuration', 'ABCS.Controllers', 'ABCS.Modules', 'ABCS.Services']);
angular.module('ABCS.Configuration', []);
angular.module('ABCS.Controllers', []);
angular.module("ABCS.Modules", []);
angular.module("ABCS.Services", []);

angular.module("ABCS").run(["$rootScope", "$location", "ABCS.Services.LogService",
         function ($rootScope, $location, logger) {
             logger.log("app start");
         }]);

angular.module('ABCS.Configuration').factory("ABCS.Configuration.Environment", function () {
    return {
        logOutputElementId: "output",
        hasConsole: console && console.log
    };
});

angular.module("ABCS.Services").factory("ABCS.Services.LogService",["ABCS.Configuration.Environment",function (environment) {
  function LogService() {
    this.log = function (message) {
        if (typeof (environment.logOutputElementId) === "string") {
            document.getElementById(environment.logOutputElementId).innerHTML += message + "<br/>";
        }
        else if (environment.hasConsole) {
            console.log(message);
        }
        else {
            alert(message);
        }
    }
  }

  return new LogService();
}]);

angularJS allows to reopen a module definition in multiple files , and javascript namespacing is totally unecessary unless the object is not tight to the angularJS application.

Mixing javascript namespacing and DI namespacing makes code more error prone ,not more maintanable.

share|improve this answer
    
Now, I understand what you mean "all that namespacing is totally unecessary" :) All modules/services will live in App itself, so there will be no name collisions. But what about the controllers? All examples I saw, defines the controller as usual JS method...can I make controllers in the same way as modules, without defining variables? BTW, your code doesn't work, so if you can help me to understand why (I'm not talking about syntax errors), I think I will use it and remove unnecessary variables and namespaces :) –  Alex Dn Feb 5 '13 at 18:51
    
jsbin.com/alemik/6/edit , the code seems to work like the original one.In angularJS you have multiple ways of doing things , that's why you can use simple function declaration as a controller. –  mpm Feb 5 '13 at 18:57
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When you've got several modules, you need to make sure that you declare your modules' dependencies. This tells the dependency injector to look in those modules when looking for providers.

var ABCS = angular.module("ABCS", [
    'ABCS.Services', 'ABCS.Configuration', 'ABCS.Controllers',
    'ABCS.Modules', 'ABCS.Services'
]);

I had to make a few more adjustments to get it working:

  • The dependency injector won't inject an entire module, and so ABCS.Services.LogService.$inject = ["ABCS.Configuration"]; wasn't working. I've changed that to ABCS.Services.LogService.$inject = ["ABCS.Configuration.Environment"]; and adjusted the associated factory in order to fit your naming conventions.
  • factory accepts a function, but won't call it as a constructor, and thus using this in your definition of LogService won't act as you are expecting it to. I've changed your factory function to define a constructor function, which is then instantiated and returned.

See a working version here: http://jsbin.com/alemik/2/edit

share|improve this answer
    
Hm...I thought it will be simpler :) Thanks for help, the solution is working. –  Alex Dn Feb 5 '13 at 18:47
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