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I have a method that excepts an IEnumerable<T> and a lambda expression that describes the field to be used to compare a linq-to-sql collection to an array. The method returns the matching records.

public IEnumerable<ZipCode> match<T>(IEnumerable<T> values, 
        Func<ZipCode, T> matchPhrase) {
    return (from zipCode in _table
            where values.Contains<T>(matchPhrase)
            select zipCode).Distinct();
}

I'm getting the error:

Argument type 'Func<ZipCode, T>' is not assignable to parameter type 'T'

The method would be called like so (where values is an IEnumerable<string> and x.zipcode is a string):

var zipCodes = _zipCodeRepository.match(values, x => x.zipcode)

UPDATE

Based on John's suggestion of using HashSet<T> I have changed my code however I'm getting a different error now

Method 'System.Object DynamicInvoke(System.Object[])' has no supported translation to SQL.

I think I may not have been clear on my question and I think I'm using the wrong method signature to get my desired outcome. Let me explain with a more simple code example:

public IEnumerable<ZipCode> match(IEnumerable<string> values) {
    return (from zipCode in _table
            where values.Contains(zipCode.zipcode)
            select zipCode).Distinct();
}

I am tyring to accomplish this but with anonymous types. I would like to pass in the field to be used in the Contains() via a lambda. So zipCode.zipcode would be passed into the method as the second argument: x => x.zipcode

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1  
You almost certainly want to put values into a HashSet right at the start so that you can more effectively search it. As it is you're enumerating values, doing a linear search, for each item in _table. This is both very inefficient, and also iterating the enumerable many times, which really should be avoided in a function like this. –  Servy Feb 4 '13 at 19:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect you wanted to call the delegate:

return (from zipCode in _table
        where values.Contains(matchPhrase(zipCode))
        select zipCode).Distinct();

Mind you, that would potentially be very expensive. You might want to create a set first:

HashSet<T> valueSet = new HashSet<T>(values);
return _table.Where(x => valueSet.Contains(matchPhrase(x))
             .Distinct();

(I've removed the query expression here as it was doing more harm than good in terms of readability.)

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Please edit to second argument name above –  bflemi3 Feb 4 '13 at 19:56
1  
@bflemi3 I was about to suggest you not name the argument to the function the same as the method itself...it could cause confusion. –  Servy Feb 4 '13 at 19:56
    
@JonSkeet Why using a HashSet and then use Where and Contains while the LINQ join method perfectly do this task in a more performant way? –  Cédric Bignon Feb 4 '13 at 20:07
2  
@CédricBignon: What makes you think a join is more performant? That's basically what the join would do internally. The join is a fine solution, but I don't think it would perform any better. –  Jon Skeet Feb 4 '13 at 20:27
    
@bflemi3: That's what you get for not only not using the right name in the original version of your code, but also forcing sideways scrolling - it's better to format code to avoid scrolling where possible. I've updated it now, of course. –  Jon Skeet Feb 4 '13 at 20:28

You forgot (zipCode) in Contains

public IEnumerable<ZipCode> match<T>(IEnumerable<T> values, Func<ZipCode, T> matchPhrase) {
    return (from zipCode in _table
            where values.Contains(matchPhrase(zipCode))  // <- Here (and you don't need to specify <T>, the compiler deduce it from the argument)
            select zipCode).Distinct();
}

You can use a Join method to have better performance (complexity in O(n)):

public IEnumerable<ZipCode> match<T>(IEnumerable<T> values, Func<ZipCode, T> matchPhrase)
{
    return (from zipCode in _table
            join value in values on matchPhrase(zipCode) equals value
            select zipCode).Distinct();
}
share|improve this answer
    
match is a function, and contains doesn't accept a function at all. –  Servy Feb 4 '13 at 19:53
    
@Servy I've fixed it –  Cédric Bignon Feb 4 '13 at 19:55
    
please see edit to second argument name above –  bflemi3 Feb 4 '13 at 19:56
    
@bflemi3 Take a look at the join "version" of your method. It reduces the complexity from O(n^2) to O(n). –  Cédric Bignon Feb 4 '13 at 20:03

Contains only accepts a string as argument, not an Expression. You won't be able to parametrize it on this level.

You could pass in the whole where part as parameter:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
    class Program
    {
         static void Main(string[] args)
         {
             var values = new List<string>();
             values.Add("123");

             Console.WriteLine(
                 Match(zip => values.Contains(zip.Code)).Count()); // -> 1

             Console.WriteLine(
                 Match(zip => values.Contains(zip.OtherCode)).Count()); // -> 0

             Console.Read();
         }

         public static IEnumerable<ZipCode> Match(Expression<Func<ZipCode, bool>> predicate)
         {
             var table = new List<ZipCode> 
                      { new ZipCode { Code = "123" }, new ZipCode { OtherCode = "234" } }
                .AsQueryable();

             return (from zipCode in table.Where(predicate)
                    select zipCode).Distinct();
         }
     }
     public class ZipCode
     {
         public string Code { get; set; }

         public string OtherCode { get; set; }
     }
}
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