Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on an app where users enter pricing quotes. They want to be able to have multiple revisions of the quotes and have access to all of them to revise and view.

Currently the data is stored in a Quotes table that looks like this:

QuoteID (PK, autonumber) data1, data2, data3 and so on.

QuoteID foreign keys to other tables for one to many relationships for details about the quote.

Is there a way to keep all of the revisions in the Quotes table AND handle revisions? This way, the FK relationships to other tables would not be broken.

share|improve this question
    
What is the scope of the revisions you need to support? All or some combination of columns, or just one in particular? –  OMG Ponies Sep 24 '09 at 3:44
    
All columns are needed for each revision –  Bill Martin Sep 24 '09 at 12:36
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on what you said and some gueses as to what else/what more you need, I came up with the following table structure outline (tables in ALLCAPS, columns in CamelCase; columns ending in Id are identities or suitable natural keys; where the ColumnId name matches that table name, it's a primary key, otherwise it's a foreign key into the referenced table):

--  CUSTOMER  ----
CustomerId

--  QUOTE  ----
QuoteId
CustomerId
Data1Id

--  QUOTEREVISION  ----
QuoteRevisionid
QuoteId
CreatedAt
Data2Id
Data3Id

--  DATA1  ----
Data1Id

--  DATA2  ----
Data2Id

--  DATA3  ----
Data3Id

CUSTOMER records who can make quotes.

QUOTE tracks a customer's pricing quotes. One row for every given [whatever] that they're entering quotes for.

QUOTEREVISION records each quote revision they enter. When a Quote is first created, the first QuoteRevision will also be created. CreatedAt would be a dateimte, to keep track of when they occured. QuoteId + CreatedAt is the natural key for the table, so you might not need QuoteRevisionsId.

DATA1, DATA2, DATA3, and others as needed contain the extra information. I configured Data1 to hold information relevant to the quote level--that is, the same fact would apply to each quote revision. Data2 and Data3 would contain data that could vary from revision to revision.

I've no doubt there's stuff in here that doesn't apply to your problem, but hopefully this gives you some ideas for possible solutions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could add a Revision column to both your Quotes table and the other tables making a compound key but that would probably be a bit awkward to keep in sync. I think your best bet is to make the QuoteID column NOT be a primary key and add a new primary key that is used to link the Quotes table to the other tables. The QuoteID then becomes just a field that you can search on (you'd probably want to create an index on it).

share|improve this answer
add comment

I agree with the design of Philip Kelley, I may only notice that quote revision you can calculate in the output using ROW_NUMBER() or it emulations according to your DBMS.

There is also a nice book about storing historical data: http://www.cs.arizona.edu/people/rts/tdbbook.pdf

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm think that the separate database tables for data elements (as follows) may make the database structure more complex.

-- DATA1 ---- Data1Id

-- DATA2 ---- Data2Id

-- DATA3 ---- Data3Id

What's your take on creating these data elements as the columns in the revision table instead?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.