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I have a service which is checking for new task all the time. If there is new task, I want to refresh the activity UI to show that info. I did find https://github.com/commonsguy/cw-andtutorials/tree/master/18-LocalService/ this example. Is that a good approch ? Any other examples?

Thanks.

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See my answer here. Easy to define an Interface to communicate between classes using listeners. stackoverflow.com/questions/14660671/… – Simon Feb 4 '13 at 21:30
up vote 121 down vote accepted

In your service: (using COPA as service in example below).

Use a LocalBroadCastManager. In your service's onCreate, set up the broadcaster:

broadcaster = LocalBroadcastManager.getInstance(this);

When you want to notify the UI of something:

static final public String COPA_RESULT = "com.controlj.copame.backend.COPAService.REQUEST_PROCESSED";

static final public String COPA_MESSAGE = "com.controlj.copame.backend.COPAService.COPA_MSG";

public void sendResult(String message) {
    Intent intent = new Intent(COPA_RESULT);
    if(message != null)
        intent.putExtra(COPA_MESSAGE, message);
    broadcaster.sendBroadcast(intent);
}

In your Activity:

Create a listener on onCreate:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    super.setContentView(R.layout.copa);
    receiver = new BroadcastReceiver() {
        @Override
        public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
            String s = intent.getStringExtra(COPAService.COPA_MESSAGE);
            // do something here.
        }
    };
}

and register it in onStart:

@Override
protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();
    LocalBroadcastManager.getInstance(this).registerReceiver((receiver), 
        new IntentFilter(COPAService.COPA_RESULT)
    );
}

@Override
protected void onStop() {
    LocalBroadcastManager.getInstance(this).unregisterReceiver(receiver);
    super.onStop();
}
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3  
Thanks a bunch! – user200658 Feb 4 '13 at 22:26
4  
@user200658 Yes, onStart() and onStop() are part of the Activity lifecycle - see Activity Lifecycle – Clyde Feb 6 '13 at 0:02
1  
Thanks.Got it working! – user200658 Feb 6 '13 at 18:13
8  
Tiny comment - you're missing the definition of COPA_MESSAGE. – Lior Oct 7 '13 at 11:50
1  
Thank you :) Those who are asking about COPA_RESULT, it's nothing but a user generated static variable. "COPA" is his service name so you can replace it with yours completely. In my case, it's static final public String MP_Result = "com.widefide.musicplayer.MusicService.REQUEST_PROCESSED"; – TheOnlyAnil Sep 12 '15 at 19:21

for me the simplest solution was to send a broadcast, in the activity oncreate i registered and defined the broadcast like this (updateUIReciver is defined as a class instance) :

 IntentFilter filter = new IntentFilter();

 filter.addAction("com.hello.action"); 

 updateUIReciver = new BroadcastReceiver() {

            @Override
            public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
                //UI update here

            }
        };
 registerReceiver(updateUIReciver,filter);

And from the service you send the intent like this:

Intent local = new Intent();

local.setAction("com.hello.action");

this.sendBroadcast(local);

don't forget to unregister the recover in the activity on destroy :

unregisterReceiver(updateUIReciver);
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This is better solution but it would be better to use LocalBroadcastManager if its being used within the application which would be more efficient. – Psypher Sep 7 '14 at 6:53

I would recommend checking out Otto, an EventBus tailored specifically to Android. Your Activity/UI can listen to events posted on the Bus from the Service, and decouple itself from the backend.

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I would use a bound service to do that and communicate with it by implementing a listener in my activity. So if your app implements myServiceListener, you can register it as a listener in your service after you have bound with it, call listener.onUpdateUI from your bound service and update your UI in there!

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This looks like exactly what I am looking for. Let me try it out. Thanks. – user200658 Feb 4 '13 at 21:18
    
Be careful to not leak a reference to your activity. Because your activity might be destroyed and recreated on rotation. – Eric Feb 23 '14 at 22:32
    
Hi, please check this out link. I had shared a sample code for this. Putting the link here assuming that someone may feel helpful in future. myownandroid.blogspot.in/2012/08/… – jrhamza Feb 5 '15 at 6:44

Clyde's solution works, but it is a broadcast, which I am pretty sure will be less efficient than calling a method directly. I could be mistaken, but I think the broadcasts are meant more for inter-application communication.

I'm assuming you already know how to bind a service with an Activity. I do something sort of like the code below to handle this kind of problem:

class MyService extends Service {
    MyFragment mMyFragment = null;
    MyFragment mMyOtherFragment = null;

    private void networkLoop() {
        ...

        //received new data for list.
        if(myFragment != null)
            myFragment.updateList();
        }

        ...

        //received new data for textView
        if(myFragment !=null)
            myFragment.updateText();

        ...

        //received new data for textView
        if(myOtherFragment !=null)
            myOtherFragment.updateSomething();

        ...
    }
}


class MyFragment extends Fragment {

    public void onResume() {
        super.onResume()
        //Assuming your activity bound to your service
        getActivity().mMyService.mMyFragment=this;
    }

    public void onPause() {
        super.onPause()
        //Assuming your activity bound to your service
        getActivity().mMyService.mMyFragment=null;
    }

    public void updateList() {
        runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                //Update the list.
            }
        });
    }

    public void updateText() {
       //as above
    }
}

class MyOtherFragment extends Fragment {
             public void onResume() {
        super.onResume()
        //Assuming your activity bound to your service
        getActivity().mMyService.mMyOtherFragment=this;
    }

    public void onPause() {
        super.onPause()
        //Assuming your activity bound to your service
        getActivity().mMyService.mMyOtherFragment=null;
    }

    public void updateSomething() {//etc... }
}

I left out bits for thread safety, which is essential. Make sure to use locks or something like that when checking and using or changing the fragment references on the service.

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4  
LocalBroadcastManager is designed for communication within an application, so is quite efficient. The bound service approach is ok when you have a limited number of clients for the service and the service doesn't need to run independently. The local broadcast approach allows the service to be more effectively decoupled from its clients, and makes thread-safety a non-issue. – Clyde Jan 22 '14 at 21:59
Callback from service to activity to update UI.
ResultReceiver receiver = new ResultReceiver(new Handler()) {
    protected void onReceiveResult(int resultCode, Bundle resultData) {
        //process results or update UI
    }
}

Intent instructionServiceIntent = new Intent(context, InstructionService.class);
instructionServiceIntent.putExtra("receiver", receiver);
context.startService(instructionServiceIntent);
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