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public static bool CheckExpired()
{
    DateTime expiryDate, currentDate = DateTime.Today;
    DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate);

    if (expiryDate > currentDate)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else { return false; }
}

This is what I have now. However, I'd like there to be a third option for if a date isn't formatted correctly. As it is now, it jumps straight to the else and returns false.

The problem is that I want three possible results:

true --> has not expired

false --> has expired

third --> invalid date entered

I'm just stuck on how I get there. I know I could easily just use a String return type, but is there any way around that?

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2  
Your question title doesn't reflect on your question whatsoever. –  antonijn Feb 4 '13 at 21:03
    
@Antonijn - My goal is to check a date relative to the current date. I want to return the result in a non-string variable type. I need help with the design. I don't know how I could phrased it in a better way –  user1993843 Feb 4 '13 at 21:05
1  
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Feb 4 '13 at 21:11

9 Answers 9

A few options;

  1. use a bool? type; then you can return null as a result. PRoblem with that is, 'null' doesn't really have meaning in your context so usage isn't clear

  2. throw an Exception if not formatted correctly. Probably makes the usage clearer (can't pass a badly formatted date), but means you'll need a try-catch in all callers

  3. use an enum as a return value, which can explicitly set names for your outcomes.

I think an enum would probably make the most sense here, and be the clearest for consumers of the method;

public enum ExpiredResult
{
    Expired,
    NotExpired,
    FormatError,
}
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Enum, I hadn't thought of that. I was trying to avoid exception handling for this task so that is great also. Thanks –  user1993843 Feb 4 '13 at 21:08

You could use a NullableBool,

    public static bool? CheckExpired(string date)
    {
        DateTime expiryDate, currentDate = DateTime.Today;
        if (DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate))
        {
            return expiryDate > currentDate;
        }
        return null;
    }

true --> has not expired

false --> has expired

null --> invalid date entered

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Thought to that solution also, but is it "understandable" ? –  Raphaël Althaus Feb 4 '13 at 21:06
    
Ah, nullable types would give me a third option. I see. Thanks! –  user1993843 Feb 4 '13 at 21:06

Since DateTime.TryParse() returns a bool if successful, you can trigger off that.

if(DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate))
{
    if (expiryDate > currentDate)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else { return false; }
}
else
{
    Console.Write("Invalid date.");
}

Then use a Nullable instead of a bool for a return type.

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At least write it to the error stream then. –  antonijn Feb 4 '13 at 21:06
    
@Antonijn I could throw an Exception too, but his third option just says third --> invalid date entered, so I'm going to assume he's using a Console Application. –  Bob. Feb 4 '13 at 21:07
    
This doesn't really answer the question of 'how can I return a value for invalid date input' –  RJ Lohan Feb 4 '13 at 21:07
    
@Bob The standard error output stream: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.console.error.aspx –  antonijn Feb 4 '13 at 21:09

I refactored the code slightly. But this could be a solution:

public static bool CheckExpired()
{
    DateTime expiryDate, currentDate = DateTime.Today;

    if (!DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate))
    {
         throw new Exception("Invalid date");
    }

    return (expiryDate > currentDate);
}
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You can use a nullable bool (bool?) or a int

it will return null if it the string failed to convert into a datetime

public static bool? CheckExpired()
    {
        DateTime expiryDate, currentDate = DateTime.Today;
        DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate);
        if (expiryDate == new DateTime())
        {
            return null;
        }
        if (expiryDate > currentDate)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else 
        { return false; }
    }
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Sounds like a job for an enum ...

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I would go with an enum. Something along the lines of:

public static DateValidationResult CheckExpired(string date)
{
    DateTime expiryDate, currentDate = DateTime.Today;
    if (!DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate))
        return DateValidationResult.InvalidDate;

    return expiryDate > currentDate ? DateValidationResult.Ok : DateValidationResult.Fail;
}

public enum DateValidationResult
{
    InvalidDate,
    Ok,
    Fail
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

public static bool? CheckExpired(string date)
{
    DateTime expiryDate;
    DateTime currentDate = DateTime.Today;

    if (!DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate))
    {
        return null;
    }

    return (expiryDate > currentDate);
}

Check for a null return value, or a valid true/false value like so:

string date = "2/4/2013";
bool? isExpired = CheckExpired(date);

if (!isExpired.HasValue)
{
    Console.Write("Invalid date");
}
else if (isExpired.Value)
{
    Console.Write("Expired");
}
else // if (!isExpired.Value)
{
    Console.Write("Valid");
}
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Personally I'd just write an Enum to encapsulate the return states, something like this:

public enum ExipiryStatus
{
    Expired,
    NotExpired,
    InvalidDate
}

public static ExipiryStatus CheckExpired(string date)
{
    DateTime expiryDate, currentDate = DateTime.Today;

    if (DateTime.TryParse(date, out expiryDate))
    {
        if (expiryDate > currentDate)
        {
            return ExipiryStatus.Expired;
        }
        else
        {
            return ExipiryStatus.NotExpired;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return ExipiryStatus.InvalidDate;
    }
}

I really don't like nullable bools for this kind of thing. It's never very clear at the call site what the return values are supposed to be. With an enum, it's explicit.

[EDIT] Beaten to it. :)

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