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I have a curiously recurring template pattern class and a derived class like so:

template<class Derived>
class A {
  typedef typename Derived::C D;
  D x;
};
class B : public A<B> {
public:
  class C { };
};

This fails to compile due to B not being fully defined when the compiler attempts to define D. How can I achieve a similar result, i.e. have members of A that are of a type defined in B? Or do I have to force C to be defined outside of B?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Or do I have to force C to be defined outside of B?

Yes, unfortunately you have to do this. Usually you can define a template class before A and specialize it for B, containing the C type. This allows you to use it in A.

template<typename T>
struct members;

template<class Derived>
class A {
  typedef typename members<Derived>::C D;
  D x;
};

template<>
struct members<class B> {
  class C { };
};
class B : public A<B> {
public:
};
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1  
Thanks for the answer and good example. Also I think a public: or friend class A<B>; is required in members<class B> to actually allow A to use C. –  Dylan Feb 5 '13 at 10:07
    
@Dylan Yeah, I meant to make members a struct to get the public access. –  Pubby Feb 5 '13 at 19:12

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