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What if a make a class Foo and define a function called initialize and a function called new?

Later on, if I code foo = Foo.new, which function will be running? Since the initialize function is supposed to be called when declaring new.

EDIT:

for clarification:

class Foo
    def new
    end
end

that's the sort of thing I'm talking about.

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2 Answers 2

If you defined new on the class, it would call your function and override the typical new method which would create a new instance of the class. It's better if you don't override it at all, but you can still do it and get away with it in Ruby because Ruby's nice like that.

If you still want a new instance of the class after that, you can call Foo.allocate to get that. Then you can call initialize on that object manually to trigger any initialization events.

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The manually defined new function will not be called when doing Foo.new because the manually defined new function will be an instance function. Foo.new is calling a class function.

class Foo
    def new
        puts 'new!'
        123
    end

    def initialize
        puts 'initialize'
    end
end

c = Foo.new
puts c  #this will print "#<Confusion:0xb75b20f4>"
c.new   #this will print "new!"

EDIT:

If, however, I did this:

class Foo
    def Foo.new
    end
end

then we would run into problems as @Ryan pointed out.

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