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I am trying to test a method - and getting an error:

Cannot create an instance of the variable type 'Item' because it does not have the new() constraint

Required information for below:

public interface IHasRect
{
 Rectangle Rectangle { get; }
}

Helper class:

class Item : IHasRect
{
  public Item(Point p, int size)
  {
     m_size = size;
     m_rectangle = new Rectangle(p.X, p.Y, m_size, m_size); 
  }
}

For the function to be tested, I need to instantiate an object...

public class SomeClass<T> where T : IHasRect

The test:

public void CountTestHelper<Item>()
  where Item : IHasRect
  {
    Rectangle rectangle = new Rectangle(0, 0, 100, 100); 
    SomeClass<Item> target = new SomeClass<Item>(rectangle);            
    Point p = new Point(10,10);
    Item i = new Item(p, 10);      // error here        
    ...
  }
[TestMethod()]
public void CountTest()
{
  CountTestHelper<Item>();
}   

I am trying to understand what this error means, or how to fix it, by reading http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d5x73970.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x3y47hd4.aspx - but it doesn't help.

I don't understand this error - I have already constrained the "SomeClass" to be of type. I cannot constrain the entire Test class (the unit test class generated by Visual Studio, which contains all the tests) - I will get a number of other errors otherwise. The Item class doesn't have any template...

Please help me fix this error. Thank you.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The Item in the line:

Item i = new Item(p, 10);

refers to the generic type parameter Item of the CountTestHelper method, not the class Item. Change the generic parameter name e.g.

public void CountTestHelper<TItem>() where TItem : IHasRect
{
    Rectangle rectangle = new Rectangle(0, 0, 100, 100); 
    SomeClass<TItem> target = new SomeClass<TItem>(rectangle);            
    Point p = new Point(10,10);
    Item i = new Item(p, 10);    
    ...
}

alternatively you can fully qualify the name of the Item class you want to create:

public void CountTestHelper<Item>() where Item : IHasRect
{
    Rectangle rectangle = new Rectangle(0, 0, 100, 100); 
    SomeClass<Item> target = new SomeClass<Item>(rectangle);            
    Point p = new Point(10,10);
    SomeNamespace.Item i = new SomeNamespace.Item(p, 10);  
}
share|improve this answer
    
You were seeing the same thing I was. I looked at it and was like "Wait, Item is a type parameter not a type. –  BaTTy.Koda Feb 4 '13 at 22:45

You can't initialize Generic type object unless you mark it as implementing default constructor using new keyword:

public void CountTestHelper<Item>() where Item : IHasRect, new()
 {
    Rectangle rectangle = new Rectangle(0, 0, 100, 100); 
    SomeClass<Item> target = new SomeClass<Item>(rectangle);            
    Point p = new Point(10,10);
    Item i = new Item();    // constructor has to be parameterless!
    ...
 }

On the other hand, if you're trying to initializa Item type object defined somewhere else in the application try using namespace before:

MyAppNamespace.Item i = new MyAppNamespace.Item(p, 10);
share|improve this answer
    
beat me to it, this is the right answer +1 –  legrandviking Feb 4 '13 at 22:34
    
Except that you can only use the parameterless constructor with new(). I don't understand why they haven't fixed this! edit: Ahh, you've edited to mention that ;) –  Immortal Blue Feb 4 '13 at 22:35
    
'Item' must be a non-abstract type with a public parameterless constructor in order to use it as parameter 'Item' in the generic type or method 'CountTestHelper<Item>()' –  Thalia Feb 4 '13 at 22:37
    
Also, note the answer from Lee, be sure that you're familiar with generics type definitions. Here, your "Item" class is NOT the class you defined earlier, it's just a place holder type that you're temporarily calling Item... –  Immortal Blue Feb 4 '13 at 22:39

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