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Mixing this question and this other question, I have arrived to the next (pretty simple indeed) solution: the idea is make available type alias only in the scope of the actual function and check template conditions in a appropiate point:

template<typename... garbage>
struct firewall
{
   typedef typename std::enable_if<sizeof...(garbage) == 0>::type type;
};

#define FIREWALL_CALL typename = typename firewall<garbage...>::type
#define TMPL_FIREWALL typename... garbage, FIREWALL_CALL
#define TMPL_ALIAS typename
#define TMPL_CONDITION(...) typename = \
                              typename std::enable_if<__VA_ARGS__::value>::type

With this code, we can to add some alias or conditions that we want in a comfortable way. This code:

// Erase only qualifiers and references.
template<typename target>
struct pluck
{
   typedef typename std::remove_cv<
       typename std::remove_reference<target>::type>::type type;
}

// `some_fun` wants ensure its arguments are passed by non-constant values.
template<typename T>
typename pluck<T>::type
some_fun(typename pluck<T>::type a, typename pluck<T>::type b)
{
   typename pluck<T>::type c;

   // something

   return c;
}

becomes (only some_fun):

template<typename T, TMPL_FIREWALL,
         TMPL_ALIAS friendly = typename pluck<T>::type
         TMPL_CONDITION(std::is_copy_constructible<friendly>)>
friendly some_fun(friendly a, friendly b)
{
   friendly c;

   // something

   return c;
}

The purpose of the firewall, as @ipc shows in the second question that I put above, is to absorb any argument that could reemplace a local type alias defined as default template argument.

And also this make available an useful way to avoid other deeper problem: when you want to make a function parametric only for doing a perfect forwarding of an in advance known type; for example, in the next situation:

struct A
{
   template<typename... Args>
   A(Args&&... args) : _b(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
   {}

   template<typename Str>
   A(Str&& str) : _str(std::forward<Str>(str))
   {}

   B _b;
   std::string _str;
};

If you want to initialize _str using the perfect forwarding mechanism, unavoidably it becomes an ambiguity with any other template argument. This could be avoid easily with the following additional macro:

#define TMPL_PURE_FORWARDING(a, b) TMPL_FIREWALL, \
          TMPL_CONDITION(std::is_same<typename _f_pluck<a>::type, b>)

struct A
{
   template<typename... Args>
   A(Args&&... args) : _b(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
   {}

   template<typename fwStr, TMPL_PURE_FORWARDING(fwStr, std::string)>
   A(fwStr&& str) : _str(std::forward<fwStr>(str))
   {}

   B _b;
   std::string _str;
};

If fwStr isn't of type std::string, std::string&, std::string&& or their constant versions, other constructor will be choosen, and if there isn't other constructor, a compiler error will be throw, saying that std::enable_if<false, void>::type doesn't exists.

Question: in C++ always is preferable to avoid the use of macros, but, it is well-known templates are verbose, and these situations (specially the second one) are very common, or at least in my experience. Then, these macros are very useful.

Are dangerous the use of macros in this situation? Is this in general a good or useful idiom or nothing is as it seems?

share|improve this question
1  
Seems like a textbook case of overengineering. If you're writing an ugly type over and over, use a dedicated typedef alias. If you're just writing it one-off, why introduce all the ugly framework when you could just type it? –  GManNickG Feb 4 '13 at 22:54
    
But a typedef or a using alias create a definition for the entire compilation unit, when I need a concrete alias only for one concrete function, and other concrete alias for other concrete function. –  Peregring-lk Feb 4 '13 at 22:58
2  
It's not like a typedef or using alias costs anything. Who cares if it's for the entire translation unit? And like I said, if you use it only once, just write it once. It's way clearer than what you've got going on here. Imagine you wrote your code with your framework and handed it to someone else: are they going to understand it any better? –  GManNickG Feb 4 '13 at 23:00

1 Answer 1

I would not use macros.

There are situations where macros are the only possibility, but I dare to say this is not the case. Macros perform bare text-processing; what they process is not part of the C++ meta-model, but meaningless pieces of text. They are unsafe, hard to understand, and hard to maintain. So unless there is really no other way of doing something, rather avoid macros.

Moreover, your pluck<> trait basically does what std::decay<> does. This means that with a simple template alias, you can rewrite your some_fun function in a way that makes it easy to read and to parse (I got lost trying to put together all the pieces of those macros).

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
using Decay = typename std::decay<T>::type;

template<typename T> 
Decay<T> some_fun(Decay<T> a, Decay<T> b)
{
    Decay<T> c;

   // something

   return c;
}

Similarly, for the second use case you can write something like:

template<typename T, typename U>
using CheckType = typename std::enable_if<
    std::is_same<typename std::decay<T>::type, U>::value
    >::type;

struct A
{
    template<typename... Args>
    A(Args&&... args) : _b(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
    {}

    template<typename T, CheckType<T, std::string>* = nullptr>
    A(T&& str) : _str(std::forward<T>(str))
    {}

    B _b;
    std::string _str;
};
share|improve this answer
    
For the first case you're right, a using or typedef is comfortable also. But for the second case, the user can call to the constructor with two template parameters, and the check is overwritten. Thus, it is neccesary the firewall I think. –  Peregring-lk Feb 5 '13 at 9:15
    
@Peregring-lk: I do not see why the user should use two template arguments. I thought the purpose was to deduce those arguments based on the function arguments. And if the user passes two function arguments, the second overload is not viable. I believe your macro-based solution has the same structure: two template arguments (one default), and one function argument. The user could easily pass a second template argument, but again, why? –  Andy Prowl Feb 5 '13 at 13:08
    
It is a question of type segurity, for the same reason C++ is a strongly typed language. An user could have no good reason to use the second parameter, inasmuch as the second parameter isn't useful for him, but equally the door is open to make a dangerous use of the function (for example, in a inattentive or negligent use). For this reason I think the firewall is important to implement a really well formed template function. –  Peregring-lk Feb 5 '13 at 14:18
    
@Peregring-lk: But how does the firewall prevent the user from specifying a second template argument? –  Andy Prowl Feb 5 '13 at 14:20
    
Because the variadic template absorbs any aditional argument, so, default template arguments (alias) are safe because they are specified after the variadic template and never will be overwritten. And then, I check if the variadic template is empty, forcing to call the function with only the parameters that I want. –  Peregring-lk Feb 5 '13 at 14:28

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