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Is there any way to run command prompt commands from within a C# application? If so how would I do the following:

copy /b Image1.jpg + Archive.rar Image2.jpg

This basically embeds an RAR file within JPG image. I was just wondering if there was a way to do this automatically in C#. Thank you.

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5  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/181719/… (there's an answer there that does what you want). –  Matt Hamilton Sep 24 '09 at 4:27
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4 Answers

up vote 208 down vote accepted

this is all you have to do run shell commands from C#

string strCmdText;
strCmdText= "/C copy /b Image1.jpg + Archive.rar Image2.jpg";
System.Diagnostics.Process.Start("CMD.exe",strCmdText);

EDIT:

This is to hide the cmd window.

System.Diagnostics.Process process = new System.Diagnostics.Process();
System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo startInfo = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo();
startInfo.WindowStyle = System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
startInfo.FileName = "cmd.exe";
startInfo.Arguments = "/C copy /b Image1.jpg + Archive.rar Image2.jpg";
process.StartInfo = startInfo;
process.Start();
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4  
That works great! Can I just ask what the "/C" is for? –  user Sep 24 '09 at 4:42
20  
/C Carries out the command specified by string and then terminates –  Scott Ferguson Sep 24 '09 at 4:48
2  
its just to tell the cmd to run and terminate (dont wait for any user input to close the window) –  RameshVel Sep 24 '09 at 4:49
    
Thank you, one more question. Is there a way to hide the the command prompt during this? –  user Sep 24 '09 at 4:53
    
@Nate, i have updated my answer for ur comments. pls check out –  RameshVel Sep 24 '09 at 5:13
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Yes, there is (see link in Matt Hamilton's comment), but it would be easier and better to use .NET's IO classes. You can use File.ReadAllBytes to read the files and then File.WriteAllBytes to write the "embedded" version.

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8  
Loading whole files into memory just to append one to another is not very efficient, especially if files are big enough. –  Konstantin Spirin Sep 24 '09 at 5:34
2  
Try to look at the spirit of the answer. The point is that .NET has more than enough IO classes and functions to do this without having to call out to the OS shell. The particular functions I mentioned may not be the best, but those were just the simplest. It doesn't make any sense at all to call out to the shell to do this. –  Instance Hunter Sep 25 '09 at 18:01
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Though technically this doesn't directly answer question posed, it does answer the question of how to do what the original poster wanted to do: combine files. If anything, this is a post to help newbies understand what Instance Hunter and Konstantin are talking about.

This is the method I use to combine files (in this case a jpg and a zip). Note that I create a buffer that gets filled with the content of the zip file (in small chunks rather than in one big read operation), and then the buffer gets written to the back of the jpg file until the end of the zip file is reached:

private void CombineFiles(string jpgFileName, string zipFileName)
{
    using (Stream original = new FileStream(jpgFileName, FileMode.Append))
    {
        using (Stream extra = new FileStream(zipFileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
        {
            var buffer = new byte[32 * 1024];

            int blockSize;
            while ((blockSize = extra.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
            {
                original.Write(buffer, 0, blockSize);
            }
        }
    }
}
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   var proc1 = new ProcessStartInfo();
       string anyCommand; 
        proc1.UseShellExecute = true;

        proc1.WorkingDirectory = @"C:\Windows\System32";

        proc1.FileName = @"C:\Windows\System32\cmd.exe";
        proc1.Verb = "runas";
        proc1.Arguments = "/c "+anyCommand;
        proc1.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
        Process.Start(proc1);
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