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The title doesn't say much, so I'll try to explain here.

I have a table,

+------------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field      | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+------------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id         | int(11) | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| field1     | int(11) | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| field2     | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+------------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

And displaying the result,

$sql = "SELECT field1, field2 FROM tbl WHERE field1 = '$id' OR field2 = '$id'";

It lists the results as long field = id.

Everything works fins till this part. I need to sum the result of those returned rows. $id is a dynamic value generated from a predefined list clicked by a user.

What I want is to sum field1+field2 and also have them correctly filtered when id is changed.

My result right now looks something like this,

id    |   sum( field1+field2)
----------------------------
1     |    10
50    |    22
13    |    80

I want to sum (10+22+80). As mentioned how many id's or rows are displayed are dynamic. Changes based on user selection.

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2  
Which of the following do you want? (Sum of all field1) + (Sum of all field2), or sum (field1 + field2) for each row? –  N Rohler Feb 5 '13 at 0:14
    
either rerun the sql every time its filtered with a union clause containing the sum of each column. or use javascript. –  nathan hayfield Feb 5 '13 at 0:14
    
I edited my comment -- do you want the total, or the separate sums for each individual row? –  N Rohler Feb 5 '13 at 0:16
    
@NRohler sum of (all field1 + all field2) –  Johan Larsson Feb 5 '13 at 0:18
    
can't you do sum(field1) + sum(field2) –  Class Feb 5 '13 at 0:19
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lets assume that we have a table named tbl:

id    |    field1    |    field2
--------------------------------
1     |    6         |    4
50    |    10        |    12
13    |    41        |    39

The SQL query on your question:

$sql = "SELECT field1, field2 FROM tbl WHERE field1 = '$id' OR field2 = '$id'";

When the variable $id holds the value "1" such $id = 1;, the result will be:

MySQL returned an empty result set (i.e. zero rows).

Now, if the attribute field1 have the value of "6" and the attribute field2 have the value of "39", the result will be:

id    |    field1    |    field2
--------------------------------
1     |    6         |    4
13    |    41        |    39

But if your SQL query is such like this:

$sql = "SELECT field1, field2 FROM tbl WHERE id = '$id'";

And the variable $id holds the value "0", then the result will be:

id    |    field1    |    field2
--------------------------------
50    |    10        |    12

Because there's a "0" zero at the value "50" of the attribute id, on that row.


Now, do you want to sum (field1 + field2) like what's in this table:

id    |    sum(field1+field2)
-----------------------------
1     |    10
50    |    22
13    |    80

So, do you mean that your SQL query have more than one OR operator, such this:

$sql = "SELECT field1, field2 FROM tbl WHERE field1 = '$field1' OR field2 = '$field2' OR field1 = '$field3'";

Or this:

$sql = "SELECT field1, field2 FROM tbl WHERE id = '$id1' OR id = '$id2' OR $id = '$id3'";

What do you mean about your question?


I just assume that you want to sum (field1 + field2) of all the rows with have the attribute field1 or the attribute field2 that a value that matched unto their data:

$sql = "SELECT id , ( field1 + field2 ) AS `sum(field1+field2)` FROM tld WHERE field1 = '$field1' OR field2 = '$field2'";

The table result will be look like below if the variable $field1 holds the value of "6" and the variable $field2 holds the value of "39":

id    |    sum(field1+field2)
-----------------------------
1     |    10
13    |    80

Considered our assumed table data on the very top! Because the field1 with the value of "6" has a relation on the value of the field2 which is "4", therefore the sum of (6 + 4) is 10. And the sum of (field1's value 41 + field2's value 39) is 80. And now, you want to sum (10 + 80) as mentioned on the rows of the attribute sum(field1+field2)? We can use PHP script to handle that, like this if you're using MySQL:

<?php
$connection = mysqli_connect($host, $user, $password, $database);

$sql = "SELECT id , ( field1 + field2 ) AS `sum(field1+field2)` FROM tld WHERE field1 = '$field1' OR field2 = '$field2'";

$result = mysqli_query($connection, $sql);

while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($result)) {
    $sum += $row['sum(field1+field2)'];
}

echo 'The sum is: ' . $sum;
?>

You could test it if it will work..

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If you want multiple rows, with each row having a total, use:

$sql = "SELECT (field1+field2) as the_row_total FROM tbl WHERE field1 = '$id' OR field2 = '$id'";

If you want the overall grand total, use:

$sql = "SELECT SUM(field1+field2) as the_grand_total FROM tbl WHERE field1 = '$id' OR field2 = '$id'";

Note: I assume that you've sanitized $id. If not, you're standing on a landmine.

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Sorry, but didn't solve the problem. –  Johan Larsson Feb 5 '13 at 0:49
    
Sorry, but you'll have to provide more info for us to be able to help. There's some ambiguity in your question (hence my double answer), so can you please edit the question to clarify with some sample table data and what you expect to have come back? –  N Rohler Feb 5 '13 at 0:55
    
You are right, I have edited my question (at the end). –  Johan Larsson Feb 5 '13 at 1:09
1  
If you had sum(field1+field2), it wouldn't be returning multiple rows as shown above. Can you please share your current query, your current data and your current raw results? –  N Rohler Feb 5 '13 at 3:13
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