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I'm building a fairly large cms-type application with Backbone and Knockout and Knockback (ko + bb bridge library), and I'm trying to figure out a good way to abstract permissions. Also sorry in advance for the novel.

First of all, this is a pretty non-standard architecture, and the second question you might ask - why don't you use something more comprehensive like Ember or Angular? Point taken. It is what it is at this point. :)

So here's my quandary. I want an elegant api at both the controller and viewmodel level for permissions.

I have an object available to me that looks like this:

{
   'api/pages': {
     create: true, read: true, update: true, destroy: true
   },
   'api/links': {
     create: false, read: true, update: false, destroy: false
   }
   ...
}

So in my router/controllers, I'm newing up my collections/models/viewmodels, and then calling a customized render method on an already existing view. The view takes care of things like releasing the viewmodels.

initialize: function() {
  this.pages = new PagesCollection();
  this.links = new LinksCollection();
},

list: function() {
  var vm = new PageListViewmodel(this.pages, this.links);
  // adminPage method is available through inheritance
  this.adminPage('path/to/template', vm); // delegates to kb.renderTemplate under the hood.
}

So the problem with this, are these collections are totally unstructured, ie. the router doesn't know anything about them.

But what I need is for it to redirect to an unauthorized page if you're not allowed to view a particular resource.

So with the example above, I've thought about coding in before/after filters? But where would you specify what each router method is trying to access?

list: function() {
  this.authorize([this.pages, this.links], ['read'], function(pages, links) {
    // return view.
  });
}

The previous code is really cludgy..

For the viewmodels, which are more straightforward I had the idea of doing something like this - ala Ruby's CanCan:

this.currentUser.can('read', collection) // true or false
// can() would just look at the endpoint and compare to my perms object.
share|improve this question
    
Is this a bad question or just a hard problem? –  Jon Jaques Feb 5 '13 at 17:36
    
I'm always doing permissions for users in the backend, since we all know that we should "never trust the client" accessing our APIs. Doing this technique in the backend is easy, because in my app I always place classes on divs ( e.g. $el.addClass('edit') for elements that the client can delete and so on... –  drinchev Feb 9 '13 at 9:05
    
There is security on the backend. This is a client app that accesses a REST API. The client authenticates via token. That token represents the permission object I'm referencing above. The issue is that I don't want to show users a view that uses data the client is not permitted access. –  Jon Jaques Feb 9 '13 at 23:10

2 Answers 2

You could extend your router to wrap your routes callbacks to perform a validity check before allowing the action.

var Router = Backbone.Router.extend({
    routes: {
        "app/*perm": "go"
    },

    route: function(route, name, callback) {
        if (!callback) callback = this[name];

        var f = function() {
            var perms = this.authorized(Backbone.history.getFragment());
            if (perms === true) {
                callback.apply(this, arguments);
            } else {
                this.trigger('denied', perms);
            }
        };
        return Backbone.Router.prototype.route.call(this, route, name, f);
    },

    authorized: function(path) {
        // check if the path is authorized
    },

    go: function(perm) {
       // perform action
    }
});

If the path is authorized, the route performs as usual, a denied event is triggered if not.

The authorized method could be based on a list of paths mapped to your permissions objects, something like this

var permissions = {
   'api/pages': {
     create: true, read: true, update: true, destroy: true
   },
   'api/links': {
     create: false, read: true, update: false, destroy: false
   }
}
var Router = Backbone.Router.extend({
    routes: {
        "app/*perm": "go"
    },

    // protected paths, with the corresponding entry in the permissions object
    permissionsMap: {
        "app/pages": 'api/pages',
        "app/links": 'api/links',
    },

    route: function(route, name, callback) {
        // see above
    },

    // returns true if the path is allowed
    // returns an object with the path and the permission key used if not
    authorized: function(path) {
        var paths, match, permkey, perms;

        // find an entry for the current path
        paths = _.keys(this.permissionsMap);
        match = _.find(paths, function(p) {
            return path.indexOf(p)===0;            
        });
        if (!match) return true;

        //check if the read permission is allowed
        permkey = this.permissionsMap[match];
        if (!permissions[permkey]) return true;
        if (permissions[permkey].read) return true;

        return {
            path: path,
            permission: permkey
        };
    },

    go: function(perm) {}
});

And a demo http://jsfiddle.net/t2vMA/1/

share|improve this answer
    
This is great, thank you! Will take a crack at this later today. I was trying to avoid creating a mapping table - but it seems to be a necessity? I am already maintaining a structure for the site navigation so I suppose I could just register then endpoints there. Will accept this asap provided there are no other answers. –  Jon Jaques Feb 11 '13 at 18:11
    
@JonJaques, nikoshr's is a solid answer, but if you don't mind holding out accepting, I'll try to swing by tomorrow. I've solved this problem a bit differently in my app and I could try to extract some code for you, but it's too late for tonight. –  jevakallio Feb 11 '13 at 21:15
    
@fencliff Definitely solid, no doubt. That being said, if you don't mind I'm curious to see what your solution was. I don't need so much help on the implementation, it's just my lack of creativity :/ –  Jon Jaques Feb 11 '13 at 21:29
    
@fencliff Actually, think I found a nice solution. Will post an answer below with my results. Thanks anyways. –  Jon Jaques Feb 11 '13 at 22:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Nikoshr's answer gave me something to run with. I didn't think to actually override route itself. But here's my solution. I should have mentioned it in the question - but sometimes a router action requires more than one collection.

The code on this is really rough, and needs tests - but it works! Fiddle here.

Here are the relevant portions - These two methods take care of the authorization.

authorize: function(namedRoute) {
  if (this.permissions && this.collections) {
    var perms = this.permissions[namedRoute];
    if (!perms) {
      perms = {};
      // if nothing is specified for a particular  route, we
      // assume read access required for all registered controllers.
      _.each(_.keys(this.collections), function(key) {
        return perms[key] = [];
      });
    }

    var authorized = _.chain(perms)
      .map(function(reqPerms, collKey) {
        var collection = this.collections[collKey],
            permKey = _.result(collection, 'url');

        // We implicitly check for 'read'
        if (!_.contains('read')) {
          reqPerms.push('read');
        }

        return _.every(reqPerms, function(ability) {
          return userPermissions[permKey][ability];
        });
      }, this)
      .every(function(auth){ return auth; })
      .value();
    return authorized;
  }
  return true;
},
route: function(route, name, callback) {
  if (!callback) { callback = this[name]; }
  var action = function() {
    // allow anonymous routes through auth check.
    if (!name || this.authorize(name)) {
      callback.apply(this, arguments);
    } else {
      this.trigger('denied');
    }
  }
  Backbone.Router.prototype.route.call(this, route, name, action);
  return this;
}

And each controller/router inherits from the perm router, where the permissions for each action are mapped like so:

// Setup
routes: {
  'list'     : 'list',
  'list/:id' : 'detail',
  'create'   : 'create'
},

// Collection are registered so we can
// keep track of what actions use them
collections: {
  pages: new PagesCollection([{id:1, title: 'stuff'}]),
  links: new LinksCollection([{id:1, link: 'things'}])
},

// If a router method is not defined,
// 'read' access is assumed to be
// required for all registered collections.
permissions: {
  detail: {
    pages: ['update'],
    links: ['update']
  },
  create: {
    pages: ['create'],
    links: ['create', 'update']
  }
},
share|improve this answer

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