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I have a string, like a sentence, and I know for sure that there are many words with at least one space separate every adjacent two. How can I split the words into individual strings so I can loop through them?


EDIT: Bash The string is passed in as an argument. e.g. ${2} might be "cat '' cat '' file". so how can I loop through this arg ${2}?


Also, how to check if a string contains spaces?

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What kind of shell? Bash, cmd.exe, powershell... ? – Alexey Sviridov Sep 24 '09 at 5:09
    
Do you just need to loop (e.g. execute a command for each of the words)? Or do you need to store a list of words for later use? – DVK Sep 24 '09 at 20:07
up vote 104 down vote accepted

Did you try just passing the string variable to a for loop? Bash, for one, will split on whitespace automatically.

sentence="This is   a sentence."
for word in $sentence
do
    echo $word
done

 

This
is
a
sentence.
share|improve this answer
25  
The trick is to NOT quote the variable in the for command. – glenn jackman Sep 24 '09 at 10:24
    
@MobRule - the only drawback of this is that you can not easily capture (at least I don't recall of a way) the output for further processing. See my "tr" solution below for something that sends stuff to STDOUT – DVK Sep 24 '09 at 20:04
2  
You could just append it to a variable: A=${A}${word}). – Lucas Jones Sep 24 '09 at 20:11
    
set $text [this will put the words into $1,$2,$3...etc] – Rajesh Apr 9 '14 at 2:40
5  
Actually this trick is not only a wrong solution, it also is extremely dangerous due to shell globbing. touch NOPE; var='* a *'; for a in $var; do echo "[$a]"; done outputs [NOPE] [a] [NOPE] instead of the expected [*] [a] [*] (LFs replaced by SPC for readability). – Tino May 13 '15 at 9:55

I like the conversion to an array, to be able to access individual elements:

    sentence="this is a story"
    stringarray=($sentence)

now you can access individual elements directly (it starts with 0):

    echo ${stringarray[0]}

or convert back to string in order to loop:

    for i in "${stringarray[@]}"
    do
      :
      # do whatever on $i
    done

Of course looping through the string directly was answered before, but that answer had the the disadvantage to not keep track of the individual elements for later use:

    for i in $sentence
    do
      :
      # do whatever on $i
    done

See also Bash Array Reference

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2  
Perfect solution, thanks for sharing – Thiago F Macedo Jun 30 '13 at 11:35
4  
Sadly not quite perfect, because of shell-globbing: touch NOPE; var='* a *'; arr=($var); set | grep ^arr= outputs arr=([0]="NOPE" [1]="a" [2]="NOPE") instead of the expected arr=([0]="*" [1]="a" [2]="*") – Tino May 13 '15 at 10:48

Just use the shells "set" built-in. For example,

set $text

After that, individual words in $text will be in $1, $2, $3, etc. For robustness, one usually does

set -- junk $text
shift

to handle the case where $text is empty or start with a dash. For example:

text="This is          a              test"
set -- junk $text
shift
for word; do
  echo "[$word]"
done

This prints

[This]
[is]
[a]
[test]
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4  
This is an excellent way to split the var so that individual parts may be accessed directly. +1; solved my problem – Cheekysoft Jul 26 '11 at 11:28
    
I was going to suggest using awk but set is much easier. I'm now a set fanboy. Thanks @Idelic! – Yzmir Ramirez Aug 18 '12 at 1:47
1  
Please be aware of shell globbing if you do such things: touch NOPE; var='* a *'; set -- $var; for a; do echo "[$a]"; done outputs [NOPE] [a] [NOPE] instead of the expected [*] [a] [*]. Only use it if you are 101% sure that there are no SHELL metacharacters in the splitted string! – Tino May 13 '15 at 10:03
1  
@Tino: That issue applies everywhere, not only here, but in this case you could just set -f before set -- $var and set +f afterwards to disable globbing. – Idelic May 14 '15 at 5:11
2  
@Idelic: Good catch. With set -f your solution is safe, too. But set +f is the default of each shell, so it is an essential detail, which must be noted, because others are probably not aware of it (as I was, too). – Tino May 14 '15 at 12:50
$ echo "This is   a sentence." | tr -s " " "\012"
This
is
a
sentence.

For checking for spaces, use grep:

$ echo "This is   a sentence." | grep " " > /dev/null
$ echo $?
0
$ echo "Thisisasentence." | grep " " > /dev/null     
$ echo $?
1
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2  
This seems the more unixy way to do things – Simon Walker Aug 16 '13 at 9:22
    
In BASH echo "X" | can usually be replaced by <<<"X", like this: grep -s " " <<<"This contains SPC". You can spot the difference if you do something like echo X | read var in contrast to read var <<< X. Only the latter imports variable var into the current shell, while to access it in the first variant you must group like this: echo X | { read var; handle "$var"; } – Tino May 13 '15 at 11:16

The probably most easy and most secure way in BASH 3 and above is:

var="string    to  split"
read -ra arr <<<"$var"

(where arr is the array which takes the splitted parts of the string) or, if there might be newlines in the input and you want more than just the first line:

var="string    to  split"
read -ra arr -d '' <<<"$var"

(please note the space in -d '', it cannot be left away), but this might give you an unexpected newline from <<<"$var" (as this implicitly adds an LF at the end).

Example:

touch NOPE
var="* a  *"
read -ra arr <<<"$var"
for a in "${arr[@]}"; do echo "[$a]"; done

Outputs the expected

[*]
[a]
[*]

as this solution (in contrast to all previous solutions here) is not prone to unexpected and often uncontrollable shell globbing.

Also this gives you the full power of IFS as you probably want:

Example:

IFS=: read -ra arr < <(grep "^$USER:" /etc/passwd)
for a in "${arr[@]}"; do echo "[$a]"; done

Outputs something like:

[tino]
[x]
[1000]
[1000]
[Valentin Hilbig]
[/home/tino]
[/bin/bash]

As you can see, spaces can be preserved this way, too:

IFS=: read -ra arr <<<' split  :   this    '
for a in "${arr[@]}"; do echo "[$a]"; done

outputs

[ split  ]
[   this    ]

Please note that the handling of IFS in BASH is a subject on it's own, so do your tests, some interesting topics on this:

  • unset IFS: Ignores runs of SPC, TAB, NL and on line starts and ends
  • IFS='': No field separation, just reads everything
  • IFS=' ': Runs of SPC (and SPC only)

Some last example

var=$'\n\nthis is\n\n\na test\n\n'
IFS=$'\n' read -ra arr -d '' <<<"$var"
i=0; for a in "${arr[@]}"; do let i++; echo "$i [$a]"; done

outputs

1 [this is]
2 [a test]

while

unset IFS
var=$'\n\nthis is\n\n\na test\n\n'
read -ra arr -d '' <<<"$var"
i=0; for a in "${arr[@]}"; do let i++; echo "$i [$a]"; done

outputs

1 [this]
2 [is]
3 [a]
4 [test]

BTW:

  • If you are not used to $'ANSI-ESCAPED-STRING' get used to it, it's a timesaver.

  • If you do not include -r (like in read -a arr <<<"$var") then read does backslash escapes. This is left as exercise for the reader.


For the second question:

To test for something in a string I usually stick to case, as this can check for multiple cases at once (note: case only executes the first match, if you need fallthrough use multiplce case statements), and this need is quite often the case (pun intended):

case "$var" in
'')                empty_var;;                # variable is empty
*' '*)             have_space "$var";;        # have SPC
*[[:space:]]*)     have_whitespace "$var";;   # have whitespaces like TAB
*[^-+.,A-Za-z0-9]*) have_nonalnum "$var";;    # non-alphanum-chars found
*[-+.,]*)          have_punctuation "$var";;  # some punctuation chars found
*)                 default_case "$var";;      # if all above does not match
esac

So you can set the return value to check for SPC like this:

case "$var" in (*' '*) true;; (*) false;; esac

Why case? Because it usually is a bit more readable than regex sequences, and thanks to Shell metacharacters it handles 99% of all needs very well.

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Thanks a lot this really solved it for me – XAnguera Nov 5 '15 at 15:06
    
This answer deserves more upvotes, due to the globbing issues highlighted, and its comprehensiveness – Brian Agnew Mar 7 at 12:04
    
@brian Thanks. Please note that you can use set -f or set -o noglob to switch of globbing, such that shell metacharacters no more do harm in this context. But I am not really a friend of that, as this leaves behind much power of the shell / is very error prone to switch back and forth this setting. – Tino Mar 14 at 13:55

(A) To split a sentence into its words (space separated) you can simply use the default IFS by using

array=( $string )


Example running the following snippet

#!/bin/bash

sentence="this is the \"sentence\"   'you' want to split"
words=( $sentence )

len="${#words[@]}"
echo "words counted: $len"

printf "%s\n" "${words[@]}" ## print array

will output

words counted: 8
this
is
the
"sentence"
'you'
want
to
split

As you can see you can use single or double quotes too without any problem

Notes:
-- this is basically the same of mob's answer, but in this way you store the array for any further needing. If you only need a single loop, you can use his answer, which is one line shorter :)
-- please refer to this question for alternate methods to split a string based on delimiter.


(B) To check for a character in a string you can also use a regular expression match.
Example to check for the presence of a space character you can use:

regex='\s{1,}'
if [[ "$sentence" =~ $regex ]]
    then
        echo "Space here!";
fi
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For regex hint (B) a +1, but -1 for wrong solution (A) as this is error prone to shell globbing. ;) – Tino May 13 '15 at 10:53

For checking spaces just with bash:

[[ "$str" = "${str% *}" ]] && echo "no spaces" || echo "has spaces"
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