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This is variation of one of exercises from Kernighan C book. Basically prints the longest line from standard input.

My question is, if looking at the 'copy method', how does the copy method actually work if it returns void. I'm coming from Java and learning C for the first time. In the copy method, the to and from char arrays are local. How do they actually get stored in longest and line variables in the main method if they are in no way returned back to main?

I am very confused...

Thanks very much for the time!

Edit: Thank you for the replies.

One more note...

Oh. So you the author is passing the values with pointers. That is extremely confusing since the a page before it reads - "...in C the called function cannot directly alter a variable in the calling function; it can only alter its private, temporary copy." Is that correct?

Second question is, how can I make these functions pass data around just like in Java, PHP and etc. Or is this something C programmers see as a benefit?

Code from K&R

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAXLINE 1000

int getline(char line[], int maxline);
void copy(char to[], char from[]);

main () {

 int len;
 int max;
 char line[MAXLINE];
 char longest[MAXLINE];

 max = 0;

 while ((len = getline(line, MAXLINE)) > 0) {

   if(len > max) {

     max = len;
     copy(longest, line);

   }

 }

 if(max > 0) printf("%s", longest);

 return 0;
}

int getline (char line[], int limit) {

 int i, c;

 for (i = 0;  i < limit - 1 && (c = getchar()) != EOF && c != '\n';  i++) line[i] = c;

 if (c == '\n') {

  line[i] = c;
  i++;

 }

 line[i] = '\0';

 return i;
}

void copy(char to[], char from[]) {

  int i;

  i = 0;
  while((to[i] = from[i]) != '\0')
    i++;
}
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4 Answers 4

In C, everything is passed by value. You have to pay attention what is passed by value, though.

A C-style array like char from[] is not a container object, like you might expect from other languages. For most practical purposes, a C array is equivalent to a pointer to the first element, i.e. char * from.

So, the parameters to and from do get passed by value, but what they are is pointers to the data, so you can modify the data pointed to through them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Too bad Kernighan completely failed to mention this important fact. –  John W Sep 24 '09 at 5:40
1  
John W: Actually, K&R do mention it - the last paragraph in section 1.8 (near the top of page 28 in the 2nd edition), beginning with "The story is different for arrays." –  caf Sep 24 '09 at 5:57
    
Please, @caf, in the name of all that's holy, tell me you actually looked that up and don't have the entire contents of K&R committed to memory :-) –  paxdiablo Sep 24 '09 at 6:03
1  
All us C programmers have K&R tattooed in glow-in-the-dark ink on the inside of our eyelids. –  phoebus Sep 24 '09 at 7:43
    
The nice turnaround is that you can use any pointer to a sequence of data objects like an array, including ptr[1] etc. –  DevSolar Sep 24 '09 at 14:53

Whereas Java strings are immutable, in C "strings" are merely arrays of characters. By changing the characters inside the array, the changes are 'visible' outside copy().

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In an update to the question, you ask:

"…in C the called function cannot directly alter a variable in the calling function; it can only alter its private, temporary copy." Is that correct?

Yes, that is correct, even for arrays. The reasoning is subtle, though.

For an integer argument:

int somefunc(int i) { return ++i; }

the change to i in the function only affects the copy of i, not the value corresponding to i in the calling function:

int i0 = 26;
int i1 = somefunc(i0);

Similarly, for an 'array' argument:

int anotherfunc(int a[]) { return *++a; }

and call:

int array[3] = { 13, 23, 37 }; 
int n = anotherfunc(array);

the function receives a copy of the pointer array (aka &array[0]), and the change that the function makes to a in the function has no effect whatsoever on array in the calling code. However, if the function is:

int modifyfunc(int a[]) { return *(++a) = 37; }

with the call sequence:

int array[3] = { 13, 23, 37 };
int n = modifyfunc(array);
int *ip = &array[1];
int m = modifyfunc(ip);

then the function does not modify the value of array — a pointer — in the calling function, but it does modify the data that the array points at (to be precise, it sets array[1] to 37 for the first call, and array[2] to 37 for the second call), as well as modifying the copy of array (known as a inside the function).

So, as stated, C only has pass by value, but when the value passed is a pointer, it is possible for the called code to modify what the pointer points at — but not the actual pointer in the calling code.

Yes, the side-effects in the functions shown are always unnecessary. They illustrate the point, rather than being realistic code.

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First of all, this is horrible code that you are learning from. It is hard to read, hard to understand, and doesn't handle lines longer than a given limit. Ick.

But to answer your question, when copy() is called, the two arguments are pointers to the regions in memory where the character arrays are stored. So when copy is called, the variable "to" equals "longest" in the calling frame, and "from" equals "line" in the calling frame.

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For learning, it's better to start of with arbitrary limits than to try to explain pointers, malloc() and free() before even getting into the basics of string copying. In my humble opinion, anyway. –  Chris Lutz Sep 24 '09 at 5:32
    
Oh. So you the author is passing the values with pointers. That is extremely confusing since the a page before it reads - "...in C the called function cannot directly alter a variable in the calling function; it can only alter its private, temporary copy." Is that correct? Second question is, how can I make these functions pass data around just like in Java, PHP and etc. Or is this something C programmers see as a benefit? –  John W Sep 24 '09 at 5:33
    
Also, Kernighan's book is apparently described as a "Bible to C programming" by many professors and programmers. So, I stuck with this book. –  John W Sep 24 '09 at 5:34
    
The C function passes the pointer by value so you can't modify the pointer itself. However, you are free to modify the objects that the pointer points to which is the basis for using pointers in the first place. You can declare your parameter as const char * instead of char * and then the compiler won't allow you to change the contents of the string, but then you can't copy into the new string - you can only read from the string. –  Chris Lutz Sep 24 '09 at 5:36
    
It was certainly the bible in the 1980s... –  vy32 Sep 29 '09 at 21:51

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