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Take the following example data:

x <- rnorm(10000)
y <- rnorm(10000) * x
z <- rnorm(10000) * y
df <- data.frame(x,y,z)

We can produce a scatter plot matrix as follows:

splom(df)

enter image description here

But due to the large number of overlapping points it is hard to gauge the density.

Is there a straightforwards way to replace each plot with a bivariate histogram heatmap, like those produced by squash?

library(squash)
hist2(df$x, df$y)

enter image description here

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The panel.hexbinplot is convenient for large datasets.

library(hexbin)
splom(df, panel=panel.hexbinplot)

enter image description here

You can customize the panel function like this :

library(hexbin)
splom(df,
      panel = function(x, y, ...){
        panel.hexbinplot(x, y, style = "nested.lattice", 
                      type = c("g", "smooth"),col='blue', ...)
      },
      pscale=0, varname.cex=0.7)

You can play with teh style parameter.

enter image description here

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This looks very promising, but I get the following error: Error in grid.Call.graphics(L_downviewport, name$name, strict) : Viewport 'plot_01.panel.1.1.off.vp' was not found –  saffsd Feb 5 '13 at 3:48
    
@saffsd it is strange. Try to it in a new R session please. –  agstudy Feb 5 '13 at 3:51
    
The error persists in a new session. For reference: R version 2.15.1 (2012-06-22) -- "Roasted Marshmallows" Platform: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu (64-bit) –  saffsd Feb 5 '13 at 3:56
    
@saffsd I can't test it on a linux version now. But on windows it works. –  agstudy Feb 5 '13 at 4:01
    
The problem is with the type=XXX argument, removing that produces a working plot. –  saffsd Feb 5 '13 at 4:04
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here's another option that's more in-line with your original request

# run the code you've provided
library(lattice)
x <- rnorm(10000)
y <- rnorm(10000) * x
z <- rnorm(10000) * y
df <- data.frame(x,y,z)

# look at each of these options one-by-one..  go slowly!

# here's your original
splom(df)


# here each point has been set to very transparent
splom(df , col="#00000005" )

enter image description here

# here each point has been set to moderately transparent
splom(df , col="#00000025" )

enter image description here

# here each point has been set to less transparent
splom(df , col="#00000050" )

enter image description here

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2  
It is a good idea to make the points smaller as well, e.g. splom(df , col="#00000040", pch = '.' ). –  Andy W Feb 5 '13 at 13:04
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this isn't the method you asked for, but does help you solve the fundamental issue you've described :)

# run the code you've provided
library(lattice)
x <- rnorm(10000)
y <- rnorm(10000) * x
z <- rnorm(10000) * y
df <- data.frame(x,y,z)

# figure out what ten percent of the total records are
ten.percent <- nrow( df ) / 10

# create a new data frame `df2` containing
# a randomly-sampled ten percent of the original data frame
df2 <- df[ sample( nrow( df ) , ten.percent  ) , ]

# now `splom` that.. and notice it's easier to see densities
splom(df2)
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