Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A chest is composed of treasure.
enter image description here
I've implemented it the following way:

treasure.hpp

#pragma once
class Treasure{

    public:
    protected:
    private:

    //data members
    int gold;

};

chest.hpp

#pragma once
class Chest{

    private: 
    #include "treasure/treasure.hpp"

    public:
    protected:
    private:

    //data members
    Treasure treasure;

};

*Assume both header files get compiled with their corresponding ".cpp"s to create object files.

Is it appropriate to include the header file for treasure inside the class declaration of chest?
It makes sense to me, because I get the following behaviour:
enter image description here
*Main can not create or directly access Treasure.

#include "chest.hpp"

int main(int argc, char** argv){

    Chest chest;
}

I've never seen it this way, so I'm not sure if it is bad practice.

In regards to composition, which method is preferred:

  1. including the header before the class declaration; having main indirectly include Treasure?
  2. #including the header privately inside the class declaration as shown above?
share|improve this question
    
Hell no, it is not :-) –  user405725 Feb 5 '13 at 1:54
    
Its a matter of style only, but I believe .hpp is an extension thats used for class template implementations typically. –  Karthik T Feb 5 '13 at 2:00
    
Including the header like this will result in a new nested class decl (Chest::Treasure), and then undefined link errors when you link against your impl file if it (likely) contain definitions for ::Treasure. –  mythagel Feb 5 '13 at 2:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would #include "treasure.hpp" at the top of chest.hpp before the Chest class declaration.. Not all treasure is found in a chest. If main() wants to create a Treasure that is not in a Chest, it should be allowed to do so.

On the other hand, I certainly can imagine times where a private class would be useful. In such a situation, I would code the private class directly inside the outer class rather than #include it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, other than that, composition is basically what you did: chests have treasure instances inside them. –  uʍop ǝpısdn Feb 5 '13 at 1:55

I would have main include the file indirectly (treasures include is at the top of chest). It does not make very much sense to have multiple includes. In fact, that's one of the main uses of those precompiler directives; to prevent compilation errors due to a file being included multiple times.

If you do it the other way you couldn't do things main like; create new treasure and add it to your chest or take treasure out of your chest and work with it independently. That implementation would only make sense if the object B was used exclusively by object A.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.