Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the worst security hole you've ever seen? It is probably a good idea to keep details limited to protect the guilty.

For what it's worth, here's a question about what to do if you find a security hole, and another with some useful answers if a company doesn't (seem to) respond.

share

locked by Tim Post Oct 13 '11 at 6:42

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

closed as not constructive by Tim Post Oct 13 '11 at 6:41

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

47  
Should be community wiki imo... –  ChristopheD Sep 24 '09 at 5:38
15  
the 60 answers and 28 upvotes would seem to outweigh the 5 votes to close (that took all day to accumulate, AFAIK). but I will refrain from voting to reopen until this has been discussed. –  rmeador Sep 24 '09 at 22:57
7  
Even if your question has been community wiki for hours, the comment is still a good comment to upvote, as it reminds people that questions similar to this one should be community wiki. That's what I think. –  Joren Sep 25 '09 at 19:44

163 Answers 163

Last year, I discovered that the website used to handle our checks/statements for the company I was working for was riddled with SQL injection holes.

Needless to say, they fixed their holes pretty quickly.

share

An application using faces and managedbeans. The bean used to edit the user already logged in was the same used by the self-register form, where two hidden fields were the only difference. Meaning? If you get someone's document number (equivalent to SSN in USA), you could actually change their password.

share

My old school had the student's passwords the same as their username, PLUS it was easy to get their usernames (a number, ex 123233), then you could hit add column and find out the first and last name of the students, as well as their usernames. So it was easy to put random garbage in their accounts and make them think there was a "ghost in the machine"

share

I've had at least 1 previous co-worker who probably qualified as that.

share
5  
Your co-worker qualified as the worst security hole you've ever seen? –  Mike Daniels Oct 23 '10 at 5:55

The worst security hole I've seen was from a (very very bad) hosting company. And even worse it was just some months ago (summer 2010)! You had to first connect to your hosting package control panel (you needed valid credentials). Once logged in all you had to change was the id GET token from the URL and voilà, you're in the control panel of another user! You have access (save/edit/delete) to emails, files, databases. The ids were sequential so you only have to do +1 and you're in the next account. I hope someone have been fired for this!

It was one of the many WTF I've experienced with them! Fortunately I wasn't one of their customers!

share

A friend of mine did his login via GET. Needless to say he learned the lesson the hard way.

share
1  
How is login via post "more secure" than get? They're nearly identical on the HTTP level. –  Incognito Oct 23 '10 at 16:25

How about publishing your ELMAH error log on the Internet?

share

Not controlling logical operator (OR) in Password data entry element. By using it, every one can easily pass the other where conditions. For, the select query will be like this one:

select *
from TheTable
where UserName=@id And Password=@pass OR 1=1
share
1  
This seems like a 'normal' SQL injection attack...though, the query looks like a parameterised one...so I don't get it. –  Bobby Oct 30 '10 at 12:59
1  
Not to mention that, for most purposes, passwords should be hashed first and put in the database second. That means that an OR 1=1 should simply affect some bits. –  David Thornley Nov 1 '10 at 16:49

Who can forget the classic Windows 98 security hole?

Copying password text *** and pasting it into a word processor would show you the password on just about anything.

share
  1. I was going to earn my credit with the supervisor for my quite advanced graphics program at a SunOS / Solaris with instant messaging enabled where with zephyr.vars or whatever it was called you could make an image appear on your listed friend's screen like if you alowed me I could just send you an image that appeared on your display. While I was demoing the program I had written so that the supervisor could give me credit for it, one of my friends sitting close or in the next room made the photo big-mama.xxx appear on my screen. There was never any discussion or penalty because of the incident and I got credit for the project that for ½ second seemed like it was programmed to display big-mama.xxx instead of solving the problem.

  2. (Earlier) I updated perl scripts and waited for sysadmin to reflect the changes to ouside the FW. Then the database was gone and it was not a bug it was a feature since the data was stored with the source and therefore updating the source blanked the persistence.

Physical access or simulating a login prompt or a login screen are 2 other difficult cases without being too technical about algorithms it's easy to understand that a physical access makes many possibilities and simulating a login prompt is something you can do on many different types of computers and environments.

share

Hitting the cancel button on Windows 98 login screen would give you access to the system anyway.

share
5  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1469899/…. –  Joe White Jul 14 '10 at 12:26

I used to hack Novel Login (DOS prompt). I wrote a C program to simulate a login prompt and write to the file whatever the login/passowrd is and output the invalid password.

I had fun in the college days.

share
14  
Not security hole. More like phishing. If you can get physical access to a box then it has at least 1000 holes. –  SyaZ Sep 24 '09 at 10:50
1  
Any machine you find lying around on the street that you give security information to is a potential problem. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 27 '09 at 14:37

The worst security hole is to use Internet Explorer's option to remember your passwords. What people don't realize is that tools such as this one by Nirsoft can reveal all your passwords.

share
5  
Why only IE? You can decode Firefox's password file as well. Chrome goes one step further - it's memory of form fields is held in a plain text file, so if you've typed in a credit card number into a field where the site developer didn't turn autofill off ... –  blowdart Sep 26 '09 at 7:20
7  
@blowdart - if you use a master password with firefox, the password file is encrypted with the master password as the key. See luxsci.com/blog/… –  Si. Sep 28 '09 at 1:04
1  
-1 This behavior is exactly correct: I can view all my passwords. My passwords are encrypted with my Windows credentials. Unless you know my password, you can't get my password. If you change, or reset, my password: you cannot access my passwords. You want Windows to protect your passwords from you? –  Ian Boyd Nov 9 '10 at 13:52

protected by C. A. McCann Jul 19 '11 at 16:49

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.