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I want to just keep today's log in logs directory.

use POSIX qw(mktime);
use Time::Local;
my $file="20130204.log";
print "$file\t";
open my $fh,'<',$file;
my $modtime = (stat($fh))[9];
print "modtime:$modtime\n";
my $time = timelocal(59,59,23,4,2,2013);
print "Time::Local::time(2013-2-4 23:59:59) => $time\n";
$time = mktime(59,59,59,4,2,2013-1900,0,0);
print "mktime(2013-2-4 23:59:59) => $time\n";

results:

20130204.log        modtime:1359989999
Time::Local::time(2013-2-4 23:59:59) => 1362409199
mktime(2013-2-4 23:59:59) => 1362538799

date: Tue Feb 5 10:57:00 JST 2013

ls -l

-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 945203711 Feb  4 23:59 20130204.log

date -d '2013-02-04 23:59:59' +%s: 1359989999

Why Time::Local::time and mktime do not give me 1359989999?

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2  
you can stat a filename, you don't have to open it. –  ysth Feb 5 '13 at 2:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Jan = 0, 1900 = 0

$time = timelocal(59,59,23,4,2-1,2013-1900);
$time = mktime(59,59,59,4,2-1,2013-1900,0,0);
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Thanks. Is there an convenient way to get the unix timestamp of everyday's 00:00:00 using Perl's core libs? –  Sato Feb 5 '13 at 2:29
    
@Sato everyday's? like in a range? –  ysth Feb 5 '13 at 2:30
    
@ysth sorry, I execute this script everyday, I want to get the unix timestamp of "today's 00:00:00" –  Sato Feb 5 '13 at 2:39
1  
timelocal(0,0,0, (localtime)[3,4,5]). Don't ask new questions in comments, please. –  ikegami Feb 5 '13 at 2:43
1  
@Sato: note that not every day has a 00:00:00, e.g. $ENV{TZ}="America/Sao_Paulo"; POSIX::tzset(); print scalar localtime timelocal(0,0,0,21,9,112) –  ysth Feb 5 '13 at 4:28

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