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I have a situation where I would like to use a single QThread to run two (or more) separate methods at different times. For example, I would like the QThread to run play() sometimes, and when I am done playing, I want to disconnect the QThread from this method so that I may connect it somewhere else. In essence I would like the QThread to act as a container for anything I would like to run in parallel with the main process.

I have run into the problem where starting the QThread and then immediately disconnecting it causes strange behavior at runtime. Before I discovered what 'race condition' meant (or really understanding much about multithreading), I had the sneaking suspicion that the thread wasn't fully started before being disconnected. To overcome this, I added a 5 ms sleep in between the start() and disconnect() calls and it works like a charm. It works like a charm but it isn't The Right Way.

How can I implement this functionality with one QThread without making the call to sleep()?

Code Snippet in Question:

def play(self):

        self.stateLabel.setText("Status: Playback initated ...")

        self.myThread.started.connect(self.mouseRecorder.play)
        self.myThread.start()
        time.sleep(.005)  #This is the line I'd like to eliminate

        self.myThread.started.disconnect()

Full Script:

class MouseRecord(QtCore.QObject):

    finished = QtCore.pyqtSignal()    

    def __init__(self):

        super(MouseRecord, self).__init__()        

        self.isRecording = False
        self.cursorPath = []

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot()  
    def record(self):

        self.isRecording = True
        self.cursorPath = []

        while(self.isRecording):

            self.cursorPath.append(win32api.GetCursorPos())
            time.sleep(.02)            

        self.finished.emit()

    def stop(self):

        self.isRecording = False

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot()    
    def play(self):

        for pos in self.cursorPath:
            win32api.SetCursorPos(pos)
            time.sleep(.02)        

        print "Playback complete!"
        self.finished.emit()            

class CursorCapture(QtGui.QWidget):

    def __init__(self):

        super(CursorCapture, self).__init__()

        self.mouseRecorder = MouseRecord()

        self.myThread = QtCore.QThread()

        self.mouseRecorder.moveToThread(self.myThread)
        self.mouseRecorder.finished.connect(self.myThread.quit)

        self.initUI()

    def initUI(self):

        self.recordBtn = QtGui.QPushButton("Record")
        self.stopBtn   = QtGui.QPushButton("Stop")
        self.playBtn   = QtGui.QPushButton("Play")        

        self.recordBtn.clicked.connect(self.record)
        self.stopBtn.clicked.connect(self.stop)
        self.playBtn.clicked.connect(self.play)

        self.stateLabel = QtGui.QLabel("Status: Stopped.")

        #Bunch of other GUI initialization ...

    def record(self):

        self.stateLabel.setText("Status: Recording ...")  

        self.myThread.started.connect(self.mouseRecorder.record)
        self.myThread.start()
        time.sleep(.005)        

        self.myThread.started.disconnect()

    def play(self):

        self.stateLabel.setText("Status: Playback initated ...")

        self.myThread.started.connect(self.mouseRecorder.play)
        self.myThread.start()
        time.sleep(.005)

        self.myThread.started.disconnect()
share|improve this question

The right way would be to create new QThread for each action, this way the sleep and disconnecting won't be necessary. Right now, even if you successfully eliminate the sleep call, the following scenario is possible:

1) You run play, and disconnect the slot

2) You run record before play has finished. In such situation previously created thread is still running and:

If the thread is already running, this function does nothing.

(from the documentation)

If you however accept this scenario and somehow guard against "playing" and "recording" at the same time, then you should do as you wrote yourself: "when I am done playing, I want to disconnect". So, not just after the thread was started, but after it's done. To do this try this:

1) Change self.mouseRecorder.finished.connect(self.myThread.quit) to self.mouseRecorder.finished.connect(self.threadFinished)

2) Implement:

def threadFinished(self):
        self.myThread.quit()
        self.myThread.started.disconnect()
share|improve this answer

You want to start the thread right away and communicate with the MouseRecorder instance with signals and slots FROM the gui thread.

You are signaling the MouseRecorder instance by starting the QThread (which you have the signal hooked up to trigger the specific event). Normally you will want to use that sig/slot connection if you have something that needs to happen only ONCE in a worker thread. Otherwise you will normally do the cross thread communication with any QObjects that get moveToThread with signals and slots.


Instead I'd write it as the following:

class MouseRecord(QtCore.QObject):

    def __init__(self):
        super(MouseRecord, self).__init__()        
        self.isRecording = False
        self.cursorPath = []

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot()  
    def record(self):
        self.isRecording = True
        self.cursorPath = []

        while(self.isRecording):
            #Needed, so that if a sigStop is emitted, self.isRecording will be able to be changed
            QApplication.processEvents()

            self.cursorPath.append(win32api.GetCursorPos())
            time.sleep(.02)   

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot()
    def stop(self):
        self.isRecording = False

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot()    
    def play(self):
        for pos in self.cursorPath:
            win32api.SetCursorPos(pos)
            time.sleep(.02)        
        print "Playback complete!"

class CursorCapture(QtGui.QWidget):

    sigRecord = QtCore.pyqtSignal()
    sigPlay = QtCore.pyqtSignal()
    sigStop = QtCore.pyqtSignal()

    def __init__(self):
        super(CursorCapture, self).__init__()

        self.mouseRecorder = MouseRecord()
        self.myThread = QtCore.QThread()

        self.mouseRecorder.moveToThread(self.myThread)

        self.sigRecord.connect(self.mouseRecorder.record)
        self.sigPlay.connect(self.mouseRecorder.play)
        self.sigStop.connect(self.mouseRecorder.stop)

        self.myThread.start()

        self.initUI()

    def initUI(self):
        self.recordBtn = QtGui.QPushButton("Record")
        self.stopBtn   = QtGui.QPushButton("Stop")
        self.playBtn   = QtGui.QPushButton("Play")        

        self.recordBtn.clicked.connect(self.record)
        self.stopBtn.clicked.connect(self.stop)
        self.playBtn.clicked.connect(self.play)

        self.stateLabel = QtGui.QLabel("Status: Stopped.")

        #Bunch of other GUI initialization ...

    def record(self):
        self.stateLabel.setText("Status: Recording ...")  
        self.sigRecord.emit()

    def play(self):
        self.stateLabel.setText("Status: Playback initated ...")
        self.sigPlay.emit()

    def stop(self):
        self.stateLabel.setText("Status: Recording Stopped...")
        self.sigStop.emit()

This will allow the QThread to be always running (which isn't a problem as it's not doing anything unless you tell it to) with your MouseRecorder instance waiting for signals from your gui thread.

Notice the additional need for the QApplication::processEvents().

share|improve this answer

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