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I am comparing two xml and I have to print the difference. How can I achieve this using LINQ. I know I can use XML diff patch by Microsoft but I prefer to use LINQ . If you have any other idea I will implement that

//First Xml

<Books>
 <book>  
  <id="20504" image="C01" name="C# in Depth">
 </book>  
 <book> 
  <id="20505" image="C02" name="ASP.NET">
 </book> 
 <book> 
  <id="20506" image="C03" name="LINQ in Action ">
 </book> 
 <book> 
  <id="20507" image="C04" name="Architecting Applications">
 </book> 
</Books>

//Second Xml

<Books>
  <book> 
    <id="20504" image="C011" name="C# in Depth">
  </book>
  <book> 
    <id="20505" image="C02" name="ASP.NET 2.0">
  </book>
  <book> 
    <id="20506" image="C03" name="LINQ in Action ">
  </book>
  <book> 
    <id="20508" image="C04" name="Architecting Applications">
  </book>
</Books>

I want to compare this two xml and print result like this.

Issued       Issue Type             IssueInFirst    IssueInSecond

1            image is different      C01              C011
2            name  is different      ASP.NET          ASP.NET 2.0
3            id  is different        20507            20508
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4  
How complex is the xml? If it is just root/record/@attrib it is probably doable. –  Marc Gravell Sep 24 '09 at 6:24
1  
(the xml is invalid, btw) –  Marc Gravell Sep 24 '09 at 6:36
    
Hi Marc this is very simple example in actuall xml its little bit complex. –  NETQuestion Sep 24 '09 at 6:43
    
is difference only in values and/or attributes or can structure be different too? –  grega g Sep 24 '09 at 6:53
    
Difference only in attributes values (as you see in question) . structure never change. –  NETQuestion Sep 24 '09 at 7:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is the solution:

//sanitised xmls:
string s1 = @"<Books>
                 <book id='20504' image='C01' name='C# in Depth'/>
                 <book id='20505' image='C02' name='ASP.NET'/>
                 <book id='20506' image='C03' name='LINQ in Action '/>
                 <book id='20507' image='C04' name='Architecting Applications'/>
                </Books>";
string s2 = @"<Books>
                  <book id='20504' image='C011' name='C# in Depth'/>
                  <book id='20505' image='C02' name='ASP.NET 2.0'/>
                  <book id='20506' image='C03' name='LINQ in Action '/>
                  <book id='20508' image='C04' name='Architecting Applications'/>
                </Books>";

XDocument xml1 = XDocument.Parse(s1);
XDocument xml2 = XDocument.Parse(s2);

//get cartesian product (i think)
var result1 =   from xmlBooks1 in xml1.Descendants("book")
                from xmlBooks2 in xml2.Descendants("book")
                select new { 
                            book1 = new {
                                        id=xmlBooks1.Attribute("id").Value,
                                        image=xmlBooks1.Attribute("image").Value,
                                        name=xmlBooks1.Attribute("name").Value
                                      }, 
                            book2 = new {
                                        id=xmlBooks2.Attribute("id").Value,
                                        image=xmlBooks2.Attribute("image").Value,
                                        name=xmlBooks2.Attribute("name").Value
                                      } 
                             };

//get every record that has at least one attribute the same, but not all
var result2 = from i in result1
                 where (i.book1.id == i.book2.id 
                        || i.book1.image == i.book2.image 
                        || i.book1.name == i.book2.name) &&
                        !(i.book1.id == i.book2.id 
                        && i.book1.image == i.book2.image 
                        && i.book1.name == i.book2.name) 
                 select i;



foreach (var aa in result2)
{
    //you do the output :D
}

Both linq statements probably could be merged, but I leave that as an exercise for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I would be surprised if this actually works like requested Do you really want a cross join (cartesian product)? –  dahlbyk Sep 25 '09 at 13:39
    
Yea it works. Next time you can check it yourself, before commenting. Now lets 'review' your solution. –  grega g Sep 26 '09 at 11:15
    
It produces the same result for this example set, yes. But it does not solve the general problem as I understand it. For example, suppose xml2's book with id=20508 was a typo and the next entry had the 'real' 20508 data in each source. Your solution would return two rows; mine would return one. Both correct answers depending on the question. –  dahlbyk Sep 26 '09 at 14:36
    
Hi Grega What about If we have a book which is missing first xml or second xml, which lines I have to add in above code to work. –  NETQuestion Oct 13 '09 at 21:57
1  
You mean if one book is only in one xml and not in the other? What do you want to happen than? –  grega g Oct 14 '09 at 6:09

The operation you want here is a Zip to pair up corresponding elements in your two sequences of books. That operator is being added in .NET 4.0, but we can fake it by using Select to grab the books' indices and joining on that:

var res = from b1 in xml1.Descendants("book")
                         .Select((b, i) => new { b, i })
          join b2 in xml2.Descendants("book")
                         .Select((b, i) => new { b, i })
            on b1.i equals b2.i

We'll then use a second join to compare the values of attributes by name. Note that this is an inner join; if you did want to include attributes missing from one or the other you would have to do quite a bit more work.

          select new
          {
              Row = b1.i,
              Diff = from a1 in b1.b.Attributes()
                     join a2 in b2.b.Attributes()
                       on a1.Name equals a2.Name
                     where a1.Value != a2.Value
                     select new
                     {
                         Name = a1.Name,
                         Value1 = a1.Value,
                         Value2 = a2.Value
                     }
          };

The result will be a nested collection:

foreach (var b in res)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Row {0}: ", b.Row);
    foreach (var d in b.Diff)
        Console.WriteLine(d);
}

Or to get multiple rows per book:

var report = from r in res
             from d in r.Diff
             select new { r.Row, Diff = d };

foreach (var d in report)
    Console.WriteLine(d);

Which reports the following:

{ Row = 0, Diff = { Name = image, Value1 = C01, Value2 = C011 } }
{ Row = 1, Diff = { Name = name, Value1 = ASP.NET, Value2 = ASP.NET 2.0 } }
{ Row = 3, Diff = { Name = id, Value1 = 20507, Value2 = 20508 } }
share|improve this answer
    
Well the thing with zip is that it joins first record from xml1 to first record of xml2. So if we mix xml1 a little - lets say we switch first and second <book> nodes - we get different result. That's why you need cross join. There is no reason to assume (from his question and comments) that only corresponding nodes should be compared. –  grega g Sep 26 '09 at 11:26
    
The question was described as a diff. In a diff, order matters. –  dahlbyk Sep 26 '09 at 14:27

For fun, a general solution to grega g's reading of the problem. To illustrate my objection to this approach, I've introduced a "correct" entry for 'PowerShell in Action'.

string s1 = @"<Books>
     <book id='20504' image='C01' name='C# in Depth'/>
     <book id='20505' image='C02' name='ASP.NET'/>
     <book id='20506' image='C03' name='LINQ in Action '/>
     <book id='20507' image='C04' name='Architecting Applications'/>
     <book id='20508' image='C05' name='PowerShell in Action'/>
    </Books>";
string s2 = @"<Books>
     <book id='20504' image='C011' name='C# in Depth'/>
     <book id='20505' image='C02' name='ASP.NET 2.0'/>
     <book id='20506' image='C03' name='LINQ in Action '/>
     <book id='20508' image='C04' name='Architecting Applications'/>
     <book id='20508' image='C05' name='PowerShell in Action'/>
    </Books>";

XDocument xml1 = XDocument.Parse(s1);
XDocument xml2 = XDocument.Parse(s2);

var res = from b1 in xml1.Descendants("book")
          from b2 in xml2.Descendants("book")
          let issues = from a1 in b1.Attributes()
                       join a2 in b2.Attributes()
                         on a1.Name equals a2.Name
                       select new
                       {
                           Name = a1.Name,
                           Value1 = a1.Value,
                           Value2 = a2.Value
                       }
          where issues.Any(i => i.Value1 == i.Value2)
          from issue in issues
          where issue.Value1 != issue.Value2
          select issue;

Which reports the following:

{ Name = image, Value1 = C01, Value2 = C011 }
{ Name = name, Value1 = ASP.NET, Value2 = ASP.NET 2.0 }
{ Name = id, Value1 = 20507, Value2 = 20508 }
{ Name = image, Value1 = C05, Value2 = C04 }
{ Name = name, Value1 = PowerShell in Action, Value2 = Architecting Applications }

Note that the last two entries are the "conflict" between the 20508 typo and the otherwise correct 20508 entry.

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