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I have reserved bytes that are modified by my assembly routine.

I was using pusha /* did my job */ and then popa but it results in segmentation fault.

If I replace the pusha and popa with push eax push ecx /* do my job */ pop ecx pop eax it works fine.

But why do I get this seg fault? How is it related to pusha?

Below is a part of my code. Here, I only use two out of eight registers. If I need to use eight in my routine, will I need to push and pop each register? Is there no way to do pusha and popa but keeping buf?

main:
   pusha
    mov eax,10
.AGAIN:
    cmp eax,0
    je .END
    mov [buf + ecx],'.'
    inc ecx
    dec eax
    jmp .AGAIN
.END:
    mov [buf + ecx],0
    mov ebp,buf
    call puts
    popa
    ret

don't give a seg fault:

main:
    push eax
    push ecx
    mov eax,10
.AGAIN:
    cmp eax,0
    je .END
    mov [buf + ecx],'#'
    inc ecx
    dec eax
    jmp .AGAIN
.END:
    mov [buf + ecx],0
    mov ebp,buf
    call puts
    pop ecx
    pop eax
    ret

buf is defined as:

segment readable writeable
buf rb 12

share|improve this question
    
I'm not familiar with Linux and I assume that's what you use because of the seg fault reference, but I'm surprised this second version works for you because you seem to be trashing the EBP register. –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 5 '13 at 5:45
    
What did you mean with trashing? –  Jack Feb 5 '13 at 23:12
    
I mean that most environments demand that a called function preserve the value of the ebp registry across calls and yours does not seem to. –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 5 '13 at 23:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pusha/popa save the 16-bit registers (AX, BX, CX, DX, SP, BP, SI, DI). You are changing the 32 bit registers EAX and ECX so use the 32 bit equivalent: pushad and popad.

share|improve this answer
    
Could be. I'd check disassembly to see whether or not POPA and PUSHA are prefixed. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 5 '13 at 6:04
    
Actually,the fasm assembler automatically generates the appropriate version for current mode. It's according to flat assembler 1.70 Programmer's Manual –  Jack Feb 5 '13 at 23:09
    
PUSHA and POPA action depends on the mode of FASM. In use32, they are 32bit, in use16 - 16 bit. It is always better to use the full instructions: pushaw/popaw or pushad/popad (although using 16 bit form in 32bit mode is not recommended). –  johnfound Feb 6 '13 at 20:23
    
@johnfound: Was what I said,in others(from the manual) words. –  Jack Feb 8 '13 at 2:19

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