Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two tables with identical structure. Table A contains all the current ads, Table B contains the archived ads. Column 1 (ad_id) is Primary Key, AI, INT. Table engine is MyISAM.

I need to copy all the table A ads preceding a certain date to the archive, table B. My goal is that all fields except ad_id are duplicated, ad_id should get auto-incremented. Here is what I have attempted:

INSERT INTO B`(`ad_id`, `ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`) 
    SELECT *
    FROM A
    WHERE YEAR( ad_expire ) <= 2012

Table B has many thousands of ads, Table A gets flushed often enough that the unique id field has low numbers that often duplicate the id's in Table B. So MySQL chucks a wobbly and tells me I have a Duplicate entry '8577' for key 'PRIMARY'.

So I made several attempts to get past that:

First I tried selecting the individual columns to insert, setting ad_id to NULL:

INSERT INTO B(`ad_id`, `ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`) 
    SELECT (NULL, `ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`)
    FROM A
    WHERE YEAR( ad_expire ) <= 2012 

That results in the error #1241 - Operand should contain 1 column(s), which goes away if I use the wildcard * selector, but then I get the duplicate error.

Next I tried SELECT LAST_INSERT_ID(), which always returns 0.

Then I tried a few using ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE, but I can't seem to get that to work.

I even tried to grab the highest id with:

SELECT @max := max(ad_id) FROM B;

INSERT INTO B`(`ad_id`, `ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`) 
  SELECT *
  FROM A
  WHERE YEAR( ad_expire ) <= 2012

ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE ad_id = @max + 1

This works for exactly one row, then results in a duplicate entry again (since @max is a static variable).

What am I doing wrong here? Am I making this way too difficult?

share|improve this question
    
the way you flush table, why not just keep current id's max value ? (delete from A should be enough) –  eicto Feb 5 '13 at 5:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

in your case why not use ?

INSERT INTO B(`ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`) 
    SELECT (`ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`)
    FROM A
    WHERE YEAR( ad_expire ) <= 2012 
share|improve this answer
    
This query results in #1241 - Operand should contain 1 column(s). I actually have 32 identical columns, I shortened the example for brevity. Turns out there are 5 other KEY columns for indexing purposes, could that be the issue? –  Gary D Feb 5 '13 at 17:24
    
I removed the parens from the SELECT clause and it worked. Thanks to this post: link –  Gary D Feb 5 '13 at 17:38

you may drop the primary key constraint on your ad_id of your table B using th following command.

ALTER TABLE B DROP PRIMARY KEY

Then try your usual query i.e.

INSERT INTO B`(`ad_id`, `ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`) 
    SELECT *
    FROM A
    WHERE YEAR( ad_expire ) <= 2012

UPDATE 1

if you dont want to have multiple ad_id then you may directly try this query

   INSERT INTO `B`(`ad_id`, `ad_advertiser`, `ad_ln`, `ad_expire`) 
    SELECT *
    FROM A
    WHERE YEAR( ad_expire ) <= 2012
   ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE
    ad_advertiser = VALUES(ad_advertiser), 
    ad_ln = VALUES(ad_ln), 
    ad_expire = VALUES(ad_expire);

Here is the SQL Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, this would result in duplicate id columns, correct? Not sure what the effect would be on the application. Worth trying on a copy I suppose... –  Gary D Feb 5 '13 at 17:27
    
Sorry for late reply, try other query if you dont want to have multiple ad_id.. –  Shrey Feb 6 '13 at 5:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.