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This question "How to get the CPU Usage in C#?" shows some of the ways to get the current CPU usage (%) of a computer in .NET.

Since the CPU usage fluctuates quite frequently, I think the current CPU usage is often not a good indicator of how busy a computer is (e.g. for scheduling or load balancing purpose). Is there an efficient way to get the average CPU usage in last x minute, e.g. last 5 minutes?

I am thinking of something like a method GetAverageCpuUsage(int period) that can be called by a load balancing or scheduling module.

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2 Answers 2

Actually that is exactly what PerformaceCounter from the 2nd most upvoted answer in the other question does, they are just measuring over 1 second.

The % it gives you is the average % of cpu seance the last NextValue() was made on the counter. So if you want the average cpu over the last 5 min, just call NextValue() only once every 5 min.

Here is a good article explaining how to use the performance counters.

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In this approach, you have to know when to call NextValue() the first time. In my case, this is the problem because I want GetAverageCpuUsage to be available on-demand and can be called any time. –  Louis Rhys Feb 5 '13 at 7:37
    
The problem is it does not keep historical records for you. You could use NextSample instead of NextValue periodically then do the math yourself (end value - start value)/(end time - start time), it would be your programs responsibility to store those value so some other user could query it and it could look up in it's database and calculate a value.. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 5 '13 at 7:39
    
Another option is set up a counter in windows to a rolling log file and you query the file for the last 5 min of data. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 5 '13 at 7:46
    
@what's the difference between NextSample and NextValue? By the way, thanks for the answer, +1 –  Louis Rhys Feb 5 '13 at 14:14
    
NextSample gives you the raw data as a struct. You can then use the properties of that struct (time stamp of the sample and the numeric value associated with the counter) then do the "start - end" value method I mentioned in my first comment. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 5 '13 at 14:16

try something like:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using ComTypes = System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes;
using System.Threading;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace example1
{
    public class CpuUsage
    {
        [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        static extern bool GetSystemTimes(
                    out ComTypes.FILETIME lpIdleTime,
                    out ComTypes.FILETIME lpKernelTime,
                    out ComTypes.FILETIME lpUserTime
                    );

        ComTypes.FILETIME _prevSysKernel;
        ComTypes.FILETIME _prevSysUser;

        TimeSpan _prevProcTotal;

        Int16 _cpuUsage;
        DateTime _lastRun;
        long _runCount;

        public CpuUsage()
        {
            _cpuUsage = -1;
            _lastRun = DateTime.MinValue;
            _prevSysUser.dwHighDateTime = _prevSysUser.dwLowDateTime = 0;
            _prevSysKernel.dwHighDateTime = _prevSysKernel.dwLowDateTime = 0;
            _prevProcTotal = TimeSpan.MinValue;
            _runCount = 0;
        }

        public short GetUsage()
        {
            short cpuCopy = _cpuUsage;
            if (Interlocked.Increment(ref _runCount) == 1)
            {
                if (!EnoughTimePassed)
                {
                    Interlocked.Decrement(ref _runCount);
                    return cpuCopy;
                }

                ComTypes.FILETIME sysIdle, sysKernel, sysUser;
                TimeSpan procTime;

                Process process = Process.GetCurrentProcess();
                procTime = process.TotalProcessorTime;

                if (!GetSystemTimes(out sysIdle, out sysKernel, out sysUser))
                {
                    Interlocked.Decrement(ref _runCount);
                    return cpuCopy;
                }

                if (!IsFirstRun)
                {
                    UInt64 sysKernelDiff = SubtractTimes(sysKernel, _prevSysKernel);
                    UInt64 sysUserDiff = SubtractTimes(sysUser, _prevSysUser);

                    UInt64 sysTotal = sysKernelDiff + sysUserDiff;

                    Int64 procTotal = procTime.Ticks - _prevProcTotal.Ticks;

                    if (sysTotal > 0)
                    {
                        _cpuUsage = (short)((100.0 * procTotal) / sysTotal);
                    }
                }

                _prevProcTotal = procTime;
                _prevSysKernel = sysKernel;
                _prevSysUser = sysUser;

                _lastRun = DateTime.Now;

                cpuCopy = _cpuUsage;
            }
            Interlocked.Decrement(ref _runCount);

            return cpuCopy;

        }

        private UInt64 SubtractTimes(ComTypes.FILETIME a, ComTypes.FILETIME b)
        {
            UInt64 aInt = ((UInt64)(a.dwHighDateTime << 32)) | (UInt64)a.dwLowDateTime;
            UInt64 bInt = ((UInt64)(b.dwHighDateTime << 32)) | (UInt64)b.dwLowDateTime;

            return aInt - bInt;
        }

        private bool EnoughTimePassed
        {
            get
            {
                const int minimumElapsedMS = 250;
                TimeSpan sinceLast = DateTime.Now - _lastRun;
                return sinceLast.TotalMilliseconds > minimumElapsedMS;
            }
        }

        private bool IsFirstRun
        {
            get
            {
                return (_lastRun == DateTime.MinValue);
            }
        }
    }
}

after using it so well in ur code:

   CpuUsage _cu = new CpuUsage();
   string cpuUsage = _cu.GetUsage();

have helped on something

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