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I have five classes, declared so:

template <typename T>
class A {
    void fn(X);
};
template <typename T>
class B {};
class C {};
class D {};
class X {};

and I have two instances declared so:

A<B<C>> abc;
A<B<D>> abd;

How can I templatize fn so that one must call abc.fn() with an object of type C and abd.fn() with an object of type D?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do a partial specialization of your class like this:

template <typename T> class A;
template <typename T> class B {};

template <typename T>
class A<B<T> > {
  public:
    void fn(T) { }
};

class C {};

class D {};

int main(int,char**)
{
  A<B<C>> abc;
  A<B<D>> abd;
  abc.fn(C());
  abd.fn(D());
  return 0;
}

If you want it to work for any template, and not just B, you can partially specialize class A like this:

template <typename T,template <typename> class U>
class A<U<T> > {
  public:
    void fn(T) { }
};
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What about when I want to use types other than B? –  anthropomorphic Feb 6 '13 at 19:44
    
@MichaelDorst: Do you want it to work for A<U<T> > for any template U? –  Vaughn Cato Feb 6 '13 at 20:38
    
Yes, @Vaughn. That is what I want. –  anthropomorphic Feb 8 '13 at 3:35
    
@MichaelDorst: I've added an example of how that can be done. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 8 '13 at 14:00

This is not going to be too pretty.

template <typename T>
class B {public: typedef T type;};

template <typename T>
class A {
    void fn(typename T::type X);
    //void fn(...){}  // would prevent an error if T does not have type.
};

Basically you save the type in a typedef and then use that in A. This would error out of course if B does the T of A does not have T::type.

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For the sake of the cut down sample, there are some accessibility problems as well, what with class defaulting to private :) –  chris Feb 5 '13 at 6:06
    
@chris fixed it –  Karthik T Feb 5 '13 at 6:07
    
Your last sentence is confusing me. –  anthropomorphic Feb 5 '13 at 6:08
1  
You're missing a typename as well. –  ildjarn Feb 5 '13 at 6:09
    
@MichaelDorst, It would give an error if the T you instantiate A with does not have a public type typedef. –  chris Feb 5 '13 at 6:10

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