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I have a pretty complex query, but I applied some indexing and now it runs very smoothly in less than 1 second. The structure of the query is like this (I find it unnecessary to post the full query as I will later prove - the fault is not in the query itself):

DECLARE @period varchar(6);
SET @period = '201302';

DECLARE @day datetime;
SET @day = dba.fnu_firstdate(@period);//returns 2013-02-01

SELECT
    user_id,
    (SELECT CAST(MAX(c1) AS varchar) FROM table t WHERE t.user_id = table.user_id AND when = DATEADD(day, 0, @day)) Day01,
    ...    
    (SELECT CAST(MAX(c1) AS varchar) FROM table t WHERE t.user_id = table.user_id AND when = DATEADD(day, 30, @day)) Day31
FROM
    table

So yeah, if I execute this query, it takes about 1 second to complete, which is perfectly fine for me. However, as you can see, I need to supply parameter for it. Thus I changed it to a table valued function so I could easily make select queries from it:

CREATE FUNCTION fnu_data(@period varchar(6))
RETURNS @results TABLE
(
    id int,
    Day01 varchar(10) null,
    ...
    Day31 varchar(10) null
)
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @day datetime;
    SET @day = dba.fnu_firstdate(@period);

    INSERT INTO @results 
    (
        id,     
        Day01,
        ...
        Day31
    )
    SELECT

SELECT
    user_id,
    (SELECT CAST(MAX(c1) AS varchar) FROM table t WHERE t.user_id = table.user_id AND when = DATEADD(day, 0, @day)) Day01,
    ...    
    (SELECT CAST(MAX(c1) AS varchar) FROM table t WHERE t.user_id = table.user_id AND when = DATEADD(day, 30, @day)) Day31
FROM
    table

RETURN

Now when I do

SELECT * FROM dba.fnu_data('201302')

it takes 6 seconds, which is way too long. Advised by my colleague I tried adding a primary index on id and replacing every subselect as joins, but it extended the time to execute the query to 8 seconds. (P.S. the query returns ~3200 rows).

In my opinion, the culprit is the insertion, but I do not see how I can get rid of it.

What can I do to improve my query?

share|improve this question
    
Can you please give me more details (maybe put it into answer?)? I don't understand how I can move function parameter (table that I return) outside the function? –  Andrius Naruševičius Feb 5 '13 at 7:14
    
Perhaps comparing the plan for the INSERT ... SELECT with that for the underlying SELECT alone could reveal something. Anyway, your SELECT statement seems clearly suboptimal to me. –  Andriy M Feb 5 '13 at 7:26
    
I do not claim that my query is perfect, but it is executing pretty fast, at least fast enough for me. I have just tried creating a temporary table and inserting the way I do the insert in the function and it ran perfectly fine (1 second) again! Now I am totally confused as of what is the problem. –  Andrius Naruševičius Feb 5 '13 at 7:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure what might cause the difference in performance between the standalone SELECT and the INSERT ... SELECT as part of your function, but I could suggest a rewrite to your SELECT statement, as your SELECT looks definitely suboptimal to me.

You seem to be doing a pivot, for which there's a native syntax in SQL Server 2005+. Consider the following query:

WITH data AS (
  SELECT
    user_id,
    DAY([when]) AS day,
    c1
  FROM [table] t
  CROSS APPLY (
    SELECT CAST(@period + '01' AS date)  -- this is supposed to be a replacement
                                         -- for dba.fnu_firstdate(), but you
                                         -- could use your function here instead
  ) x (startdate)
  WHERE t.day >= x.startdate
    AND t.day <  DATEADD(MONTH, 1, startdate)
)
INSERT INTO @results
(
  id,
  Day01,
  ...
  Day31
)
SELECT
  id,     
  [1],
  ...
  [31]
FROM data
PIVOT (
  MAX(c1) FOR day IN ([1], [2], ..., [30], [31])
) p
;

It prepares the data for the specified month as a separate step, using a common table expression, then pivots the results with aggregating, using the PIVOT syntax.

Note that the above does the entire job using a single statement, which is also a SELECT statement. That means you could transform your multi-statement TVF into an inline TVF:

IF OBJECT_ID('dba.fnu_data') IS NOT NULL
  DROP FUNCTION dba.fnu_data
GO
CREATE FUNCTION dba.fnu_data(@period varchar(6))
RETURNS TABLE
RETURN (
  WITH data AS (
    SELECT
      user_id,
      DAY([when]) AS day,
      c1
    FROM [table] t
    CROSS APPLY (
      SELECT CAST(@period + '01' AS date)
    ) x (startdate)
    WHERE t.day >= x.startdate
      AND t.day <  DATEADD(MONTH, 1, startdate)
  )
  SELECT
    id,
    CAST([1] AS varchar(30)) AS Day01,
    ...
    CAST([31] AS varchar(30)) AS Day31
  FROM data
  PIVOT (
    MAX(c1) FOR day IN ([1], [2], ..., [30], [31])
  ) p
)
GO

An inline TVF has the advantage before a multi-statement TVF in that the plan for it is chosen in consideration with the entire query in which the function is being called. An inline TVF is like a view in this respect.

Note that the transformation must be done using DROP + CREATE, like above, because multi-statement TVFs and inline TVFs are distinct kinds of objects in SQL Server, and one can't be ALTERed into the other.

share|improve this answer
    
My first thought: what kind of sorcery this is? :D Then I replaced the fields to suit my needs and it worked instantly. So yeah. High level programming skills are sorcery. The only thing I am missing is that if the user had no data that month, it is not returned at all, but I will probably work that out easily. What I learned from today is that I still need to learn sooo much to become a good programmer. Awesome job, Andriy M. Thanks! –  Andrius Naruševičius Feb 5 '13 at 9:03

I do not think your problem is the physical insert... but rather the final select for the Insert.

This particular query is going to be your bottleneck as it performs at least 30 seperate SELECT's in order to generate the result set, which you then populate back into your table variable.

SELECT
    user_id,
    (SELECT CAST(MAX(c1) AS varchar) FROM table t WHERE t.user_id = table.user_id AND when = DATEADD(day, 0, @day)) Day01,
    ...    
    (SELECT CAST(MAX(c1) AS varchar) FROM table t WHERE t.user_id = table.user_id AND when = DATEADD(day, 30, @day)) Day31
FROM
    table

Could you explain what it is you are trying to achieve exactly from this query.

share|improve this answer
    
If in short: I am selecting the highest value by a certain user for each day for the month given as parameter. As I stated in the question, I execute exactly the same query outside the function and it runs in less than 1 second. Now that I move it into the function, it takes 6 seconds, so clearly to me, something within the function that is causing the problem. However, the only visible difference that I see is the insert statement and that is why I think it is its fault. –  Andrius Naruševičius Feb 5 '13 at 7:24
    
In short: the difference between the queries is that one is in the function and the other is outside it. The 31 subselects (with proper indexing that I made) take not that much time at all. –  Andrius Naruševičius Feb 5 '13 at 7:25

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