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I was wondering if there is a way to change the color on the bullets in a list.

I have a list like this:

<ul>
   <li>House</li>
   <li>Car</li>
   <li>Garden</li>
</ul>

It is not possible for me to insert anything in the li's such as a 'span' og a 'p'. So can I change the color of the bullets but not the text in some smart way?

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up vote 22 down vote accepted

If you can use an image then you can do this. And without an image you won't be able to change the color of the bullets only and not the text.

Using an image

li { list-style-image: url(images/yourimage.jpg); }

See

list-style-image

Without using an image

Then you have to edit the HTML markup and include a span inside the list and color the li and span with different colors.

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1  
Jep this could work. But actually I decided to use a background-image, and then a list-style-type: none; This gave me the freedom to position the "bullets" a little more than the list-style-image. But still you get the 1+ and right answer. – Kim Andersen Sep 24 '09 at 7:50
3  
Works with data-uri svgs as well: list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 10 10"><circle fill="red" cx="5" cy="5" r="2"/></svg>'); – Jon Surrell Sep 18 '15 at 14:42
    
Using @JonSurrell method I was able to achieve a very pleasant result. It's too bad that it isn't one of the suggested answers. The solution is cross-browser for post IE8 and easily modifiable to create interesting custom shapes. – KoldBane Sep 22 '15 at 15:39
    
@KoldBane Thanks, I'll make a full answer – Jon Surrell Sep 22 '15 at 16:22
    
@KoldBane see my new answer :) – Jon Surrell Sep 22 '15 at 16:37

I managed this without adding markup, but instead using li:before. This obviously has all the limitations of :before (no old IE support), but it seems to work with IE8, Firefox and Chrome after some very limited testing. The bullet style is also limited by what's in unicode.

li {
  list-style: none;
}
li:before {
  /* For a round bullet */
  content: '\2022';
  /* For a square bullet */
  /*content:'\25A0';*/
  display: block;
  position: relative;
  max-width: 0;
  max-height: 0;
  left: -10px;
  top: 0;
  color: green;
  font-size: 20px;
}
<ul>
  <li>foo</li>
  <li>bar</li>
</ul>

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2  
really great trick! thanks a lot for sharing – chodorowicz Apr 15 '11 at 22:03
3  
Also, here's how you might do the same thing for ordered lists: jsfiddle.net/uZRGN – Nightfirecat Sep 9 '11 at 19:28
    
Amazing solution! – Matías Aug 3 '12 at 14:34
    
Great solution @Marc! – Dan Sep 11 '12 at 4:51
3  
Excellent. With such wide IE8+ usage I think this should be the answer now. (Note I used font-size:1em to get a better-proportioned bullet!) – EvilDr Jul 3 '14 at 11:25

Building off @Marc's solution -- since the bullet character is rendered differently with different fonts and browsers, I used the following css3 technique with border-radius to make a bullet that I have more control over:

li:before {
    content: '';
    background-color: #898989;
    display: inline-block;
    position: relative;
    height: 12px;
    width: 12px;
    border-radius: 6px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 6px;
    -moz-border-radius: 6px;
    -moz-background-clip: padding;
    -webkit-background-clip: padding-box;
    background-clip: padding-box;
    margin-right: 4px;
    top: 2px;
}
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1  
Just a note to anyone looking at this post later. color should be background-color in this fix otherwise you won't see the bullet. – ddilsaver Feb 27 '13 at 13:38
    
@ddilsaver you're right, I was setting the background color in another rule that was specific to each line item (client wanted a different color on each one). i have updated. – jessica Feb 27 '13 at 16:26

Building off both @Marc and @jessica solutions - This is the solution that I use:

li { 
   position:relative;
}
li:before {
      content:'';
      display: block;
      position: absolute;
      width: 6px;
      height:6px;
      border-radius:6px;
      left: -20px;
      top: .5em;
      background-color: #000;
}

I use em for font sizes so if you set your top value to be .5em it will always be placed to the mid point of your first line of text. I used left:-20px because that is the default position of bullets in browsers: parent padding/2

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We can combine list-style-image with svgs, which we can inline in the css! This will offers incredible control of the "bullets", which can really become anything.

To get a red circle, just use the following css:

ul {
  list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 10 10" width="10" height="10"><circle fill="red" cx="5" cy="5" r="2"/></svg>');
}

But this is just the beginning. This allows us to do any crazy thing we want with those bullets. circles or rectangles are easy, but anything you can draw with svg you can stick in there! Check out the bullseye example below:

ul {
  list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 10 10" width="10" height="10"><circle fill="red" cx="5" cy="5" r="5"/></svg>');
}
ul ul {
  list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 10 10" width="10" height="10"><rect fill="red" x="0" y="0" height="10" width="10"/></svg>');
}
ul ul ul {
  list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 10 10" width="10" height="10"><circle fill="red" cx="5" cy="5" r="3"/></svg>');
}
ul ul ul ul {
  list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 10 10" width="10" height="10"><rect fill="red" x="2" y="2" height="4" width="4"/></svg>');
}
ul.bulls-eye {
  list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 10 10" width="10" height="10"><circle fill="red" cx="5" cy="5" r="5"/><circle fill="white" cx="5" cy="5" r="4"/><circle fill="red" cx="5" cy="5" r="2"/></svg>');
}
ul.multi-color {
  list-style-image: url('data:image/svg+xml,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 12 12" width="15" height="15"><circle fill="blue" cx="6" cy="6" r="6"/><circle fill="pink" cx="6" cy="6" r="4"/><circle fill="green" cx="6" cy="6" r="2"/></svg>');
}
<ul>
  <li>
    Big circles!

    <ul>
      <li>Big rectangles!</li>
      <li>b
        <ul>
          <li>Small circles!</li>
          <li>c
            <ul>
              <li>Small rectangles!</li>
              <li>b</li>
            </ul>
          </li>
        </ul>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>b</li>
</ul>

<ul class="bulls-eye">
  <li>Bulls</li>
  <li>eyes.</li>
</ul>

<ul class="multi-color">
  <li>Multi</li>
  <li>color</li>
</ul>

Width/height attributes

Some browsers require width and height attributes to be set on the <svg>, or they display nothing. At time of writing, recent versions of Firefox exhibit this problem. I've set both attributes in the examples.

Encodings

A recent comment reminded me of encodings for the data-uri. This was a pain-point for me recently, and I can share a bit of information I've researched.

The data-uri spec, which references the URI spec, says that the svg should be encoded according to the URI spec. That means all sorts of characters should be encoded, eg < becomes %3C.

Some sources suggest base64 encoding, which should fix encoding issues, however it will unnecessarily increase the size of the SVG, whereas URI encoding will not. I recommend URI encoding.

More info:

browser-support: >ie8

css tricks on svgs

mdn on svgs

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Note that data URI should be URL-encoded (with optional base64 encoding). – Salman A Nov 20 '15 at 7:56
    
@SalmanA I'm glad you mentioned this, I'm going to elaborate my answer a bit. – Jon Surrell Nov 20 '15 at 8:49
    
This does not appear to be working for me in Firefox, and IE10/11 is displaying the bullet a little too large and offset upwards. – Mike Rockett Dec 29 '15 at 14:27
    
@MikeRockett Thanks for the catch. FF44 was OK, but I've added width and height attributes to <svg>, which improves support for older 44. It will likely make display more consistent as well, but I'm not too worried about cross browser suppoprt for this minimal example. Anybody that needs perfection can just write better <svgs> :) – Jon Surrell Dec 29 '15 at 15:19
    
Thanks @JonSurrell – Mike Rockett Dec 29 '15 at 15:47

I really liked Marc's answer too - I needed a set of different colored ULs and obviously it would be easier just to use a class. Here is what I used for orange, for example:

ul.orange {
    list-style: none;
    padding: 0px;
}
ul.orange > li:before {
    content: '\25CF ';
    font-size: 15px;
    color: #F00;
    margin-right: 10px;
    padding: 0px;
    line-height: 15px;
}

Plus, I found that the hex code I used for "content:" was different than Marc's (that hex circle seemed to sit a bit too high). The one I used seems to sit perfectly in the middle. I also found several other shapes (squares, triangles, circles, etc.) right here

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Building on @ddilsaver's answer. I wanted to be able to use a sprite for the bullet. This appears to work:

li {
  list-style: none;
  position: relative;
}

li:before {
  content:'';
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  width: 20px;
  height: 20px;
  left: -30px;
  top: 5px;
  background-image: url(i20.png); 
  background-position: 0px -40px; /* or whatever offset you want */
}
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