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I have following output:

    [root@localhost:~]# setkey -DP
    (per-socket policy)
            Policy:[Invalid direciton]
            created: Feb  5 09:25:06 2013  lastused: Feb  5 10:25:10 2013
            lifetime: 0(s) validtime: 0(s)
            spid=411 seq=1 pid=4415
            refcnt=1
    (per-socket policy)
            Policy:[Invalid direciton]
            created: Feb  5 09:25:06 2013  lastused: Feb  5 10:13:21 2013
            lifetime: 0(s) validtime: 0(s)
            spid=420 seq=2 pid=4415
            refcnt=1
    192.168.111.0/24[any] 192.168.0.0/24[any] any
            out prio def ipsec
            esp/tunnel/94.243.123.241-89.28.12.86/require
            created: Feb  5 09:25:13 2013  lastused: Feb  5 09:25:44 2013
            lifetime: 0(s) validtime: 0(s)
            spid=441 seq=3 pid=4415
            refcnt=1
    192.168.0.0/24[any] 192.168.111.0/24[any] any
            in prio def ipsec
            esp/tunnel/89.28.12.86-94.243.123.241/require
            created: Feb  5 09:25:13 2013  lastused:
            lifetime: 0(s) validtime: 0(s)
            spid=448 seq=4 pid=4415
            refcnt=1
    192.168.0.0/24[any] 192.168.111.0/24[any] any
            fwd prio def ipsec
            esp/tunnel/89.28.12.86-94.243.123.241/require
            created: Feb  5 09:25:13 2013  lastused:
            lifetime: 0(s) validtime: 0(s)
            spid=458 seq=0 pid=4415
            refcnt=1

and I want to get from it only this line:

    192.168.111.0/24 192.168.0.0/24

without any knowledge about it row's placement

I have made following regexp construction, but them don't work:

    [root@localhost:~]# setkey -DP | sed -rne 's/^(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3})(\/[0-9]{1,2}).*(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3})(\/[0-9]{1,2})/\1\2\3\4/p'
    192.168.111.0111./242.168.0.0[any] any
    192.168.0.00./242.168.111.0[any] any
    192.168.0.00./242.168.111.0[any] any

    [root@localhost:~]# setkey -DP | sed -rne 's/^(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\/[0-9]{1,2}).*(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\/[0-9]{1,2})/\1\2/p'
    192.168.111.0/24111.[any] any
    192.168.0.0/240.[any] any
    192.168.0.0/240.[any] any

Where are the errors?

Thank you in advance, Evgheni

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would rather find each group of number separately, something like this maybe:

sed -rn 's|[^0-9]*(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}/[0-9]{1,2})|\1\n|g; s/\n[^\n]*$//; s/\n/ /gp'

Output:

192.168.111.0/24 192.168.0.0/24
192.168.0.0/24 192.168.111.0/24
192.168.0.0/24 192.168.111.0/24

However, if you want to match the pair of groups, you may change your second regex into this:

sed -rne 's/^(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\/[0-9]{1,2})[^0-9]*(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\/[0-9]{1,2}).*/\1 \3/p'
  1. Use a negation group [^0-9]* to do non-greedy matching between the number groups.
  2. Add .* at the end to match everything after the number groups.
  3. You want to replace everything with the first and third backreference (\1 and \3). Backreferences are numbered based on the position of their starting parenthesis.
share|improve this answer
    
Great decision, I found my errors. Thank you for full explanation. – Evgheni Antropov Feb 5 '13 at 10:28
    
sorry for disturbing, but how will be better to take only first or second of match without using pipe. Changing p on q in expression doesn't work ( – Evgheni Antropov Feb 5 '13 at 10:36
    
Want to find an alternative for setkey -DP | sed -rne 's/^(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\/[0-9]{1,2})[^0-9]*(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}‌​\/[0-9]{1,2}).*/\1 \3/p' | sed q 192.168.111.0/24 192.168.0.0/24 – Evgheni Antropov Feb 5 '13 at 10:47
1  
@EvgheniAntropov: ok I misunderstood your question. You can do this with the t command which branches if the last substitute command was successful: sed 's/.../.../; t a; b; :a; p; q'. – Thor Feb 5 '13 at 12:38
1  
A cleaner way would be to use match instead of substitute: sed -rne '/^(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\/[0-9]{1,2})[^0-9]*(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\‌​/[0-9]{1,2}).*/ { s//\1 \3/; p; q }'. – Thor Feb 5 '13 at 12:42

If you wish to use sed, then Thors answer should suffice. However, assuming you're after the first pattern match in your file, you could simply use grep and xargs:

< file grep -m 1 -oE "([0-9]{1,3}[\./]){4}[0-9]{1,2}" | xargs -n 2

Results:

192.168.111.0/24 192.168.0.0/24

If you are after all matches, drop the -m 1 flag. HTH.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you man, I don't want to use grep + xargs, cause of busybox using, but your expression working well: setkey -DP | grep -m 1 -oE "([0-9]{1,3}[\./]){4}[0-9]{1,2}" | busybox xargs -n 2 192.168.111.0/24 192.168.0.0/24 – Evgheni Antropov Feb 5 '13 at 10:27

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