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I have the following bash script:

tar -zxvf $1
cd $1

It should extract the archive file and enter the directory that was created. Typically, package archive file creates directory with the same name, as the file, without extension, for example, mpc-1.0.1.tar.gz creates mpc-1.0.1 directory. How can I change the line cd $1 to get directory name? Archive files have several extensions: tar.gz, tat.xz, tar.bz2.

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marked as duplicate by Peter O., fedorqui Oct 8 '14 at 15:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You could use the cut command to remove the last two extensions (the ".tar.gz" part):

$ echo "foo.tar.gz" | cut -d'.' --complement -f2-
foo

As noted by Clayton Hughes in a comment, this will not work for the actual example in the question. So as an alternative I propose using sed with extended regular expressions, like this:

$ echo "mpc-1.0.1.tar.gz" | sed -r 's/\.[[:alnum:]]+\.[[:alnum:]]+$//'
mpc-1.0.1

It works by removing the last two (alpha-numeric) extensions unconditionally.

[Updated again after comment from Anders Lindahl]

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3  
This only works in the case where the filename/path doesn't contain any other dots: echo "mpc-1.0.1.tar.gz" | cut -d'.' --complement -f2- produces "mpc-1" (just the first 2 fields after delimiting by .) –  Clayton Hughes Dec 4 '13 at 0:39
    
@ClaytonHughes You're correct, and I should have tested it better. Added another solution. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 4 '13 at 7:52
    
The sed expressions should use $ to check that the matched extension is at the end of the file name. Otherwise, a filename like i.like.tar.gz.files.tar.bz2 might produce unexpected result. –  Anders Lindahl Dec 4 '13 at 7:56
    
@AndersLindahl It still will, if the order of the extensions is the reverse of the sed chain order. Even with $ at the end a filename such as mpc-1.0.1.tar.bz2.tar.gz will remove both .tar.gz and then .tar.bz2. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 4 '13 at 8:03

You can use the magic of POSIX variables:

bash-3.2$ FILENAME=somefile.tar.gz
bash-3.2$ echo ${FILENAME%%.*}
somefile
bash-3.2$ echo ${FILENAME%.*}
somefile.tar

There's a caveat in that if your filename was of the form ./somefile.tar.gz then echo ${FILENAME%%.*} would greedily remove the longest match to the . and you'd have the empty string.

(You can work around that with a temporary variable:

FULL_FILENAME=$FILENAME
FILENAME=${FULL_FILENAME##*/}
echo ${FILENAME%%.*}

)


This site explains more.

${variable%pattern}
  Trim the shortest match from the end
${variable##pattern}
  Trim the longest match from the beginning
${variable%%pattern}
  Trim the longest match from the end
${variable#pattern}
  Trim the shortest match from the beginning
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2  
Much simpler than Joachim's answer but I always have to look up POSIX variable substitution. Also, this runs on Max OSX where cut doesn't have --complement and sed doesn't have -r. –  jwadsack Jul 18 '14 at 16:40
    
Amazing answer, thank you. –  dardo Aug 27 '14 at 16:27

You can use basename.

Example:

$ basename foo-bar.tar.gz .tar.gz
foo-bar

You do need to provide basename with the extension that shall be removed, however if you are always executing tar with -z then you know the extension will be .tar.gz.

This should do what you want:

tar -zxvf $1
cd $(basename $1 .tar.gz)
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2  
I suppose cd $(basename $1 .tar.gz) works for .gz files. But in question he mentioned Archive files have several extensions: tar.gz, tat.xz, tar.bz2 –  SS Hegde Feb 5 '13 at 9:00

A year plus late in the game, but this might be helpful for someone looking for a simple answer.

To expand on the POSIX Variables answer, note that you can do more interesting patterns. So for the case detailed here, you could simply do this:

tar -zxvf $1
cd ${1%.tar.*}

That will cut off the last occurrence of .tar.<something>

More generally, if you wanted to remove the last occurrence of .<something>.<something-else> then

${1.*.*}

should work fine.

The link the above answer appears to be dead. Here's a great explanation of a bunch of the string manipulation you can do directly in bash, from TLDP.

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+1 - I really hate having to pipe stuff for simple things like this. –  Lennart Rolland Jun 30 '14 at 11:08
    
Is there a way to make the match case-insensitive? –  user3019105 Jan 2 at 9:42

I use the following script

$ echo "foo.tar.gz"|rev|cut -d"." -f3-|rev
foo
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Maybe there is an option in tar to do this, did you check the man ? Otherwise you can use bash string expansion :

test="mpc-1.0.1.tar.gz"
noExt="${test/.tar.gz/}" # remove the string '.tar.gz'
echo $noExt
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cd $(tar tf $1 | sed -n 1p) –  Brent Feb 14 '14 at 21:28

A simple bash one liner. I used this to remove rst extension from all files in pwd

for each in `ls -1 *.rst`
do
     a=$(echo $each | wc -c)
     echo $each | cut -c -$(( $a-5 )) >> blognames
done

What it does ?

1) ls -1 *.rst will list all the files on stdout in new line (try).

2) echo $each | wc -c counts the number of characters in each filename .

3) echo $each | cut -c -$(( $a-5 )) selects up to last 4 characters, i.e, .rst.

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