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To alternate row color in a table using css i use :

p:nth-child(odd)
{
    background:#ff0000;
}
p:nth-child(even)
{
    background:#0000ff;
}

can anyone please explain me what's the "odd" and "even" mean ?

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6 Answers 6

<div>
    <p></p> <!-- odd child,  1st -->
    <p></p> <!-- even child, 2nd -->
    <p></p> <!-- odd child,  3rd -->
    <p></p> <!-- even child, 4th -->
    <p></p> <!-- odd child,  5th -->
    <p></p> <!-- even child, 6th -->
    <p></p> <!-- odd child,  7th -->
</div>

Check these examples about odd/even or this demo

Also, you can use it with any tag that contains squence of elements...

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haha, that is nice –  user1899563 Sep 14 '13 at 15:51
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if you have a list item for example, :odd will refer to all instances of the element that appear at 1,3,5,7 and so on, :even, 2,4,6,8 etc.

In this case, foo and foo2 will be considered :odd, bar and bar2 considered even

 - foo
 - bar
 - foo2
 - bar2
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Odd is every row number not divisible by 2 and even is every other row.

Since the first row has the index 1 and 1 modulo 2 isn't 0 it will have the red background and the second row has the index 2 and 2 modulo 2 is 0 so it's blue.

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odd: children number 1, 3, 5, 7..... even: children number 2, 4, 6, 8.....

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It refers to row numbers... If the row is even (divisible by 2) it uses background:#0000ff;, else if the row number is odd (not divisible by 2) it uses background:#ff0000;.

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Odd column ids are 1,3,5,7,.... and even column ids are 2,4,6,8,...

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