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I am creating an application which will read image byte/pixel/data from an .bmp image and store it in an byte/char/int/etc array.

Now, from this array, I want to subtract 10 (in decimal) from the data stored in the 10th index of an array.

I am able to successfully store the image information in the array created. But when I try to write the array information back to .bmp image, the image created is not viewable.

This is the piece of code which I tried to do so.

In this code, I am not subtracting 10 from the 10th index of an array.

public class Test1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException{
        File inputFile = new File("d://test.bmp");
        FileReader inputStream = new FileReader("d://test.bmp");
        FileOutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream("d://test1.bmp");
        /*
         * Create byte array large enough to hold the content of the file.
         * Use File.length to determine size of the file in bytes.
         */
        char fileContent[] = new char[(int)inputFile.length()];


        for(int i = 0; i < (int)inputFile.length(); i++){
            fileContent[i] = (char) inputStream.read();
        }

        for(int i = 0; i < (int)inputFile.length(); i++){
            outputStream.write(fileContent[i]);
        }
    }
}
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1  
Why are you using char[]? You don't have text data. Use byte[] instead. –  Jon Skeet Feb 5 '13 at 9:38
    
"I want to subtract 10 (in decimal) from the data stored in the 10th index of an array." Why exactly? –  Andrew Thompson Feb 5 '13 at 9:39
    
I want to hide some information in this image, and later retrieve the same information. I have tried using char[] also, it didn't work. byte fileContent[] = new byte[(int)inputFile.length()]; for(int i = 0; i < (int)inputFile.length(); i++){ fileContent[i] = (byte) inputStream.read(); } for(int i = 0; i < (int)inputFile.length(); i++){ outputStream.write(fileContent[i]); } outputStream.flush(); outputStream.close(); –  P K Thapa Feb 5 '13 at 9:52
    
1) This is commonly known as steganography. I've added the tag to the post. 2) It is typically not achieved by changing a specific byte in the File as you seem to be doing, but instead the 'data' of the image or sound itself. In this case you would read the fie into a BufferedImage, manipulate the image itself, and write it back out to file. 3) Add @JonSkeet (or whoever) to notify them of a new comment. 4) Code in comments is unreadable. Instead edit it into the question and use code formatting. –  Andrew Thompson Feb 5 '13 at 10:03

3 Answers 3

Instead of char[], use byte[]

Here's a modified version if your code which works:

public class Test {

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    File inputFile = new File("someinputfile.bmp");
    FileOutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream("outputfile.bmp");
    /*
     * Create byte array large enough to hold the content of the file.
     * Use File.length to determine size of the file in bytes.
     */
    byte fileContent[] = new byte[(int)inputFile.length()];


    new FileInputStream(inputFile).read(fileContent);

    for(int i = 0; i < (int)inputFile.length(); i++){
        outputStream.write(fileContent[i]);
    }

    outputStream.close();
 }
}
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Its still not working even after using byte[] array instead of char[] –  P K Thapa Feb 5 '13 at 9:54
    
did you also remember to close the OutputStream? –  NickJ Feb 5 '13 at 9:56
    
edited the answer to include working code –  NickJ Feb 5 '13 at 10:19

To make your existing code work you should replace the FileReader with a FileInputStream. According to the FileReader javadoc:

FileReader is meant for reading streams of characters. For reading streams of raw bytes, consider using a FileInputStream.

Modifying your sample as below

  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
 {
File inputFile = new File("d://test.bmp");
FileInputStream inputStream = new FileInputStream("d://test.bmp");
FileOutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream("d://test1.bmp");
/*
 * Create byte array large enough to hold the content of the file.
 * Use File.length to determine size of the file in bytes.
 */
byte fileContent[] = new byte[(int)inputFile.length()];

for(int i = 0; i < (int)inputFile.length(); i++){
    fileContent[i] =  (byte) inputStream.read();
}

inputStream.close();
for(int i = 0; i < (int)inputFile.length(); i++){
    outputStream.write(fileContent[i]);
}

outputStream.flush();
outputStream.close();

}

This work for me to create a copy of the original image.

Though as mentioned in the comments above this is probably not the correct approach for what you are trying to achieve.

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Other have pointed you at errors in your code (using char instead of byte mostly), however, even if you fix that, you probably will end up with a non-loadable image if you change the value of the 10th byte in the file.

This is because, a .bmp image file starts with an header containing information about the file (color depth, dimensions, ... see BMP file format) before any actual image data. Specifically, the 10th byte is part of a 4 byte integer storing the offset of the actual image data (pixel array). So subtracting 10 from this value will probably make the offset pointing at the wrong point in the file, and your image loader doing bound checking will probably consider this invalid.

What you really want to do is load the image as an image and manipulate the pixel values directly. Something like that:

BufferedImage originalImage = ImageIO.read(new File("d://test.bmp"));
int rgb = originalImage.getRGB(10, 0);
originalImage.setRGB(rgb >= 10 ? rgb - 10 : 0);
ImageIO.write(originalImage, "bmp", new File("d://test1.bmp"));
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