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The Code:

List<Expense> exp = new List<Expense>();
List<Budget> bud = new List<Budget>();

     bud.Add(new Budget()
     {
         sal_tp = 0,
         sal_fos_veri = 1
     });


     exp.Add(new Expense()
       {
             sal_tp =2,                                             
             sal_fos_veri = 3                            
       });
bud.Add(new Budget()
     {
         sal_tp = 4,
         sal_fos_veri = 5
     });


     exp.Add(new Expense()
       {
             sal_tp =6,                                             
             sal_fos_veri = 7                            
       });


bud.Add(new Budget()
     {
         sal_tp = 8,
         sal_fos_veri = 9
     });


     exp.Add(new Expense()
       {
             sal_tp =10,                                             
             sal_fos_veri = 11                            
       });


bud.Add(new Budget()
     {
         sal_tp = 12,
         sal_fos_veri = 13
     });


     exp.Add(new Expense()
       {
             sal_tp =14,                                             
             sal_fos_veri = 15                            
       });


bud.Add(new Budget()
     {
         sal_tp = 16,
         sal_fos_veri = 17
     });


     exp.Add(new Expense()
       {
             sal_tp =18,                                             
             sal_fos_veri = 19                            
       });


bud.Add(new Budget()
     {
         sal_tp = 20,
         sal_fos_veri = 21
     });


     exp.Add(new Expense()
       {
             sal_tp =22,                                             
             sal_fos_veri = 23                            
       });


bud.Add(new Budget()
     {
         sal_tp = 24,
         sal_fos_veri = 25
     });


     exp.Add(new Expense()
       {
             sal_tp =26,                                             
             sal_fos_veri = 27                            
       });

end of partial class

public class Expense
                    {
                        public int sal_tp { get; set; }
                        public int sal_fos_veri { get; set; }
                    }
            public class Budget
                {
                    public int sal_tp { get; set; }
                    public int sal_fos_veri { get; set; }
                  }

expecting ouput like:

*0 2 1 4 3 5 .... and so on.... *

how to iterate both the lists at a time? I have tried something like this

for(int i=0;i<bud.Count;i++)
{
                       Expense explist=exp[i];
                       Budget budlist=bud[i];
                       Response.Write(budlist.sal_tp);
                       Response.Write(explist.sal_tp);
                       Response.Write(budlist.sal_fos_veri);
                       Response.Write(explist.sal_fos_veri);
 }

problem: this will increase code, I want to iterate through that "budlist" also. Like i used to do something like this in java

for(int i=0;i<data.size();i++)
       {
          for(int j=0;j<((ArrayList)data.get(i)).size();j++)
           {
               out.print("<td>");
               out.print(((ArrayList)data.get(i)).get(j));
               out.print("</td>");
               out.print("<td>"+((ArrayList)exp_data.get(i)).get(j)+"</td>");
           }
           out.println("</tr>");
       }

Is anything like that possible?

share|improve this question
1  
You can do exactly the same thing in C#. What's the problem with that? – Daniel Hilgarth Feb 5 '13 at 9:58
4  
Not related to your question, but you shouldn't use variable names like bud, because they are confusing. Write full words. – svick Feb 5 '13 at 9:59
    
+1 to comments above. Other than that, you can give Zip a shot if you feel fancy. – Patryk Ćwiek Feb 5 '13 at 10:01
1  
I'm really confused. You do not have a nested list. And I don't see how does that snippet “increase code”. – svick Feb 5 '13 at 10:01
    
k guys i have edited, now thats just example, here I have much data above 100 + – Aadam Feb 5 '13 at 10:19

Try to extract common abstraction as

public interface  IMoneyTransaction
{
    int sal_tp { get; set; }
    int sal_fos_veri { get; set; }
}

Your class declaration would change a little bit:

public class Expense : IMoneyTransaction
{
    public int sal_tp { get; set; }
    public int sal_fos_veri { get; set; }
}

public class Budget : IMoneyTransaction
{
    public int sal_tp { get; set; }
    public int sal_fos_veri { get; set; }
}

Filling the lists as:

var exp = new List<IMoneyTransaction>{
    new Budget
    {
        sal_tp = 0,
        sal_fos_veri = 1
    }};

var bud = new List<IMoneyTransaction>{
    new Expense
    {
        sal_tp =2,                                             
        sal_fos_veri = 3                            
    }};

Now you can use Union to merge data and iterate over it using one common interface

var allItems = exp.Union(bud).ToArray();

for(int i = 0; i < allItems.Length; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine (allItems[i].sal_fos_veri);
    Console.WriteLine (allItems[i].sal_tp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would have taken this advice, but what is allItems are many say in 100's. then i have to access each element in it wright? Can i loop through allItems also? If so how? – Aadam Feb 5 '13 at 10:23
    
you are looping through allItems in the loop given above – Ilya Ivanov Feb 5 '13 at 10:26
    
See here as an example I gave only to elements, what if I have many elements, like sal_fos_veri,ab,cd,ef,gh,ij,kl,mn,bv,ed,th,uj...... then i have to write allItems[i].sal_fos_veri + allItems[i].ab + allItems[i].cd + allItems[i].ef ..... and soo on, which i dont want to do – Aadam Feb 5 '13 at 10:42
    
these are not elements, but properties. How else can you specify logic of addition, without writing it out? You can add high-level aggregate method to interface and realize it in subclasses. Use simple and straight OOP approaches. – Ilya Ivanov Feb 5 '13 at 10:44
    
oh i see, i was scratching my head for soo long, those are properties.. :) and that i dint write as addition, it was just to show, as you have seen in ques, that comes in Response.Write();, Still is there any way to get properties one by one? Thanks – Aadam Feb 5 '13 at 10:50

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