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I have made this time and date function with a bunch of if else statements. But is there a better way to do this? I think it uses a lot of processor power.

The function increments time. Each number is a var. So in seconds we have single seconds (sec) and tens of seconds (tensec).

check out the jsfiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/MLgbs/1/

$seconds = $('.seconds .one');
$tenseconds = $('.seconds .ten');
$minutes = $('.minutes .one');
$tenminutes = $('.minutes .ten');
$hours = $('.hours .one');
$tenhours = $('.hours .ten');
$days = $('.days .one');
$tendays = $('.days .ten');
$months = $('.months .one');
$tenmonths = $('.months .ten');
$years = $('.years .one');
$tenyears = $('.years .ten');
$houndredyears = $('.years .houndred');

var sec = 0;
var tensec = 0;
var min = 0;
var tenmin = 0;
var hours = 0;
var tenhours = 0;
var days = 0;
var tendays = 0;
var months = 0;
var tenmonths = 0;
var years = 0;
var tenyears = 0;
var houndredyears = 0;


function clock(){
    //Seconds
    if(sec < 9){
        sec++;
        console.log($seconds, sec);
    } else {
        sec = 0;
        console.log($seconds, sec);
        //Tenseconds
        if(tensec<5){
            tensec++;
            console.log($tenseconds, tensec);
        } else {
            tensec = 0;
            console.log($tenseconds, tensec);

            //minutes
            if(min<9){
                min++;
                console.log($minutes, min);
            } else {
                min = 0;

                console.log($minutes, min);
                //tenminutes
                if(tenmin<5){
                    tenmin++;

                    console.log($tenminutes, tenmin);
                } else {
                    tenmin=0;

                    console.log($tenminutes, tenmin);
                    //hours
                    if(hours<9 && (tenhours*10+hours<23)){
                        hours++;

                        console.log($hours, hours);
                    } else {
                        hours=0;

                        console.log($hours, hours);
                        //tenhours
                        if(tenhours<2 && (tenhours*10+hours<23)){
                            tenhours++;
                            console.log($tenhours, tenhours);
                        } else {
                            tenhours=0;
                            console.log($tenhours, tenhours);
                            if(days < 9 && (tendays*10+days<30)){
                                days++;
                                console.log($days, days);
                            } else {
                                if(days !== 0){
                                    days = 0;
                                    console.log($days, days);
                                }
                                if(tendays<2){
                                    tendays++;
                                    console.log($tendays, tendays);
                                } else {
                                    tendays = 0;
                                    console.log($tendays, tendays);
                                    if(months<9 && (tenmonths*10+months<11)){
                                        months++;
                                        console.log($months, months);
                                    } else {
                                        months = 0;
                                        console.log($months, months);
                                        if(tenmonths<0){
                                            tenmonths++;
                                            console.log($tenmonths, tenmonths);
                                        } else {
                                            tenmonths = 0;
                                            console.log($tenmonths, tenmonths);
                                            if(years < 9){
                                                years++;
                                                console.log($years, years);
                                            } else {
                                                years = 0;
                                                console.log($years, years);
                                                if(tenyears<9){
                                                    tenyears++;
                                                    console.log($tenyears, tenyears);
                                                } else {
                                                    tenyears = 0;
                                                    console.log($tenyears, tenyears);
                                                    if(houndredyears<9){
                                                        houndredyears++;
                                                        console.log($houndredyears, houndredyears);
                                                    }
                                                }
                                            }
                                        }
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

    }
}
setInterval(function(){clock();},1000);
share|improve this question
1  
setInterval is not reliable. Use the Date object! –  Bergi Feb 5 '13 at 10:08

1 Answer 1

Why don't you just use the Date() object? Rather than all this calculation, simply pull the time from it at regular intervals (several per second, say), and display that - that way, it will be synced to the time on the client computer, rather than the inaccurate setInterval function, which will probably not give an accurate reflection of the time after very long (especially given all the legwork you're making it do with a dozen or so nested conditions!)

If you have multiple users who all require reference to a common clock, use PHP to get the date instead - this will return the server date/clock, instead of the client.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats a good one. But wouldn't I then have to check each number, and log it if they change? The thing is. A animation is triggered when a number changes. The 'console.log(selector, int);' is supposed to be 'animate(selector, int);' –  Spoeken Feb 5 '13 at 11:31
    
What are you animating? It's hard to say without seeing more of your code, but if the position of elements is determined by their value, you could call animation function regardless - if the value hasn't changed, it won't animate - this would save you piling up the conditions. Would this work? –  MickMalone1983 Feb 5 '13 at 11:42
    
I'm animating a flip clock. But the animation function only adds and removes classes, the animation itself is done with css. Does this answer your question? –  Spoeken Feb 5 '13 at 12:02
1  
I think I see what you mean - still, rather than lots of conditions, you could store the clock values in an object, update from server/Date object, then iterate across it and see if any have changed. If they have, you then have a string key which can refer to the animation/class which is needed. Does that make sense? –  MickMalone1983 Feb 5 '13 at 12:13
1  
Ok cool, I'll not get the time for the next few days now but I'll check this question when I get back to London, if it's not resolved I'll have a proper look for you... –  MickMalone1983 Feb 5 '13 at 13:23

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