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I am trying to get my head around the changes in .NET 4.5, mainly the async features. To get my head around it I thought i would create a little app for archiving my massive photo collection. I learn best by doing so the application serves a double purpose.

I have read plenty MSDN articles on using async but I don't think I have a good enough understanding of it (because it's not working). My intention was to have each photo at a source folder copied to a destination folder based on its date taken (or created if taken meta data is missing). At the same time renaming it to a standard naming convention and showing the image as it is archived in an image box. I wanted the application to keep responding during the work, which is where async comes in. Now the app purpose is unimportant, the entire point was getting my head around async.

What actually happens is the app goes unresponsive, archives all the images as intended but the image box only shows the final picture. Async is kicking off the file transfer then moving on to the next image, kicking off the transfer then moving on etc etc so i end up with hundreds of open file streams rather than it waiting for each to close.

Any pointers in where I am going wrong would be appreciated. My understanding of using Tasks is shakey, returning a task serves what purpose?

imgMain is the imagebox in the XAML file. The async/await is in the archive method but showing all code as it may be relevant.

using System;
using System.Drawing.Imaging;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.IO;

namespace PhotoArchive
{
/// <summary>
/// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
/// </summary>
public partial class MainWindow : Window
{

    private string Source 
    {
        get { return txtSource.Text; }
        set { txtSource.Text = value; }
    }

    private string Destination
    {
        get { return txtDestination.Text; }
        set { txtDestination.Text = value; }
    }


    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

    }

    private void btnBrowseDataSource_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var dialogue = new FolderBrowserDialog();
        dialogue.ShowDialog();
        Source = dialogue.SelectedPath;

    }

    private void btnBrowseDestination_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var dialogue = new FolderBrowserDialog();
        dialogue.ShowDialog();
        Destination= dialogue.SelectedPath;
    }

    private void btnSort_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var files = Directory.GetFiles(Source, "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
        var result = from i in files
                     where i.ToLower().Contains(".jpg") || i.ToLower().Contains(".jpeg") || i.ToLower().Contains(".png")
                     select i;


        foreach (string f in result)
        {
            DateTime dest = GetDateTakenFromImage(f);
            Archive(f, Destination, dest);
        }

    }

    private async void Archive(string file, string destination, DateTime taken)
    {

        //Find Destination Path
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.Append(destination);
        sb.Append("\\");
        sb.Append(taken.ToString("yyyy"));
        sb.Append("\\");
        sb.Append(taken.ToString("MM"));
        sb.Append("\\");

        if (! Directory.Exists(sb.ToString()))
        {
            Directory.CreateDirectory(sb.ToString());
        }

        sb.Append(taken.ToString("dd_MM_yyyy_H_mm_ss_"));
        sb.Append((Directory.GetFiles(destination, "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Count()));
        string[] extension = file.Split('.');
        sb.Append("." + extension[extension.Length-1]);


        using (FileStream fs = File.Open(file, FileMode.Open))
        using (FileStream ds = File.Create(sb.ToString())) 
        {
            await fs.CopyToAsync(ds);
            fs.Close();
            File.Delete(file);
        }

        ImgMain.Source = new BitmapImage(new Uri(sb.ToString()));
    }

    //get date info
    private static Regex r = new Regex(":");

    public static DateTime GetDateTakenFromImage(string path)
    {
        using (var fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
        {
            using (System.Drawing.Image img = System.Drawing.Image.FromStream(fs, false, false))
            {
                PropertyItem prop;

                try
                {

                    prop = img.GetPropertyItem(36867);

                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                    prop = img.GetPropertyItem(306);
                }

                string dateTaken = r.Replace(Encoding.UTF8.GetString(prop.Value), "-", 2);
                return DateTime.Parse(dateTaken);
            }
        }


    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
I'm not an expert on the new async/await features of .Net 4.5 but one thing that does stand out to me is that the only thing you are running asynchronously is the file copy. I'm sure you will get some useful answers though with better guidance. –  Daniel Kelley Feb 5 '13 at 11:05
    
@DanielKelley What else would you want to run asynchronously? –  svick Feb 5 '13 at 12:17
    
@svick As per your answer - everything inside of Archive. Apart from awaiting fs.CopyToAsync everything else was tying up the UI thread. –  Daniel Kelley Feb 5 '13 at 12:20
    
@DanielKelley It still is, even if you await the result of Archive(). But: 1. It shouldn't be a problem, there are no long operations I can see in there. 2. Those operations don't have async versions. –  svick Feb 5 '13 at 12:25
    
@svick Maybe my comment was badly phrased - I did not mean every action should be performed using an async method (e.g. file deletions). I meant he was awaiting the file copy rather than his call to Archive - which he couldn't do due to the signature of the method being incorrect. –  Daniel Kelley Feb 5 '13 at 12:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

My understanding of using Tasks is shakey, returning a task serves what purpose?

The Task is a representation of the async operation. When the Task completes, it means the operation completed. And you can await the Task, which means you will asynchronously wait for it to complete (not blocking the UI thread).

But if you make your method async void, there is no way to wait for the operation to complete. When the method returns, you know that the async operation was started, but that's it.

What you need to do is to change Archive() to return a Task, so that you can wait for it to complete in your event handler. The Task will be returned automatically, you don't need to (or can) add any returns.

So, change the signature of Archive() to:

private async Task Archive(string file, string destination, DateTime taken)

And then await it in your event handler (which you also need to change to async):

private async void btnSort_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    // snip

    foreach (string f in result)
    {
        DateTime dest = GetDateTakenFromImage(f);
        await Archive(f, Destination, dest);
    }
}

In general, async void methods should be used only for event handlers. All other async methods should be async Task (or async Task<SomeType> if they return some value), so that you can await them.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you forget to update the signature of Archive? (+1 from me as a nice clear explanation) –  Daniel Kelley Feb 5 '13 at 11:38
    
@DanielKelley Yes, I did. Thanks, fixed now. –  svick Feb 5 '13 at 11:38
    
Great explanation, just testing it now. I think weekend reading might be needed to better understand what Tasks can do. –  James Feb 5 '13 at 11:43
    
Worked great. Now does what I expected. Thank you very much. –  James Feb 5 '13 at 11:44

You need to await the Archive method, since you only want a single instance of the Archive method to be running at any single point in time. Note that in your implementation you are starting a lot of Archive instances and not really releasing the UI-thread.

Modifications to your code:

  • Add async to btnSort_Click
  • Add return type Task to Archive
  • Await Archive in btnSort_Click

TIP: If the first method called (in your case btnSort_Click) is not async, it will not be seen as async "from the outside", ie your window and UI-thread.

share|improve this answer
    
You can't await an async void method. –  svick Feb 5 '13 at 11:28
    
I had tried that but the await throws the error 'void is not awaitable'. This is where my lack of understanding of tasks comes in i suppose. The Archive method needs to return a task? To what purpose though? Cheers –  James Feb 5 '13 at 11:31
    
@svick, that is indeed correct, Task is ofc required. –  flindeberg Feb 5 '13 at 12:11
    
@James Sorry for that mistake, the return type needs to be Task for it to be "awaitable". –  flindeberg Feb 5 '13 at 12:11

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