Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string:

(3592, -1, 7, N'SUNWopensp-root', N'1.5,REV=10.0.3.2004.12.15.14.19', N'Sun Microsystems, Inc.', N'The OpenJade Group''s SGML and XML parsing tools - platfowrm independent files, / filesystem', N'SunPackage', abc, 83)

I need to split this on commas, but NOT the ones within N' ... ' substrings.

I managed to extract all the content of N' ... ' strings with this:

N\'(.*?)(?:\',|\)|\'\))

But that does not split on commas "3592, -1, 7" and the like, while I cannot split on commas separately because that breaks up N' ... ' strings with commas. The ultimate goal is having all fields split on commas EXCEPT the ones within N' ... ' strings (i.e. N'.. , ..' should be a complete field too).

share|improve this question
1  
So, you reached the ultimate goal. Why do irrelevant first step? –  Sergio Tulentsev Feb 5 '13 at 12:16
    
yikes sorry had to type this question quickly before meeting. corrected. –  John Doe Feb 5 '13 at 12:24
1  
You already extracted the N' fields, now you can gsub them to become something like X, them you split by comma and substitute the X's with your N' fields. It's not the solution, but works. –  Kaeros Feb 5 '13 at 12:34
    
@kaeros: yeah that will do the job. I was thinking about substituting commas and apostrophes within N'...' fields and recovering them later but your solution is simpler. Make it an answer if you like, I'd mark it. –  John Doe Feb 5 '13 at 12:38
1  
It looks like CSV, except with a different quoting style. Perhaps it can be coerced to proper CSV and parsed with CSV. –  Mark Thomas Feb 5 '13 at 12:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You already extracted the N' fields, now you can gsub them to become something like X, them you split by comma and substitute the X's with your N' fields. It's not the solution, but works.

share|improve this answer
given_string.scan(/(?:(?:N'.*?')|[^,])+/)

gives:

[
  "(3592",
  " -1",
  " 7",
  " N'SUNWopensp-root'",
  " N'1.5,REV=10.0.3.2004.12.15.14.19'",
  " N'Sun Microsystems, Inc.'",
  " N'The OpenJade Group''s SGML and XML parsing tools - platfowrm independent files",
  " / filesystem'",
  " N'SunPackage'",
  " abc",
  " 83)"
]

This looks unusual as it contains spaces and parentheses, and a ' character inside a word works as a delimiter for the field N'...', but since that is what is mentioned in the question, this is what I give. If this is not exactly what you want, blame the sloppiness of the question.

share|improve this answer
1  
Instead of using lazy +, you can also use negated character class. It will not cause the regex engine to backtrack and is thus faster in production environments. given_string.scan(/(?:(?:N'[^']*')|[^,])+/) –  Akash Agrawal Feb 5 '13 at 13:21
    
@akashspeaking Exactly. I guess you mean non-greedy *?, not lazy +. –  sawa Feb 5 '13 at 14:01
    
I am sorry. I meant a lazy *. Its is referred as such alternatively. –  Akash Agrawal Feb 5 '13 at 15:31

Since that is close to CSV format, here's one way to parse it.

#remove parens and N's
csv = str.gsub(/^\(|\)$/, "").gsub(/, N/, ",")

CSV.parse_line(csv, {:quote_char => "'"})

Output:

[
 "3592",
 " -1",
 " 7",
 "SUNWopensp-root",
 "1.5,REV=10.0.3.2004.12.15.14.19",
 "Sun Microsystems, Inc.",
 "The OpenJade Group's SGML and XML parsing tools - platfowrm independent files,
 / filesystem",
 "SunPackage",
 " abc",
 " 83"
]

Note: This is the only solution that handles the doubled apostrophe correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a great solution, because CSV files are notoriously hard to parse. Show some output to confirm it works. –  the Tin Man Feb 5 '13 at 16:05
    
Thanks @theTinMan--I finally got around to it. –  Mark Thomas Feb 5 '13 at 20:14
    
+1. Nice and clean. –  the Tin Man Feb 5 '13 at 20:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.