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Sometimes, there are situations where the repetition of simple code blocks is unavoidable. To illustrate, with this example code:

Note: this code is for illustration purpose only, real-life code is much bigger and more complex. Also it may contain errors, but the point of this question is not that.

switch(cmd) {
    case CMD_BLOCK_READ:
        if(current_user != key) {
            ERROR("Access violation - invalid key!");
            res = CR_ACCESS_DENIED;
            break; 
        }
        if(current_state < STATE_BUSY) {
            WARN("Command %s is not allowed in this state!", cmd_name[cmd]);
            res = CR_NOT_PERMITTED;
            break;
        }
        if(ioctl(fd, HPI_CTL_BR) != 0) {
            WARN("Handshake failed (%s). Aborted!", strerror(errno));
            res = CR_TIME_OUT;
            goto post_resp;
        }
        if(block_read(id) != 0) {
            ERROR("Failed to read %d block (%s)! Aborted!", id, strerror(errno));
            res = CR_FAIL;
            goto send_nop;
        }

        res = CR_SUCCESS;
        break;
    case CMD_BLOCK_WRITE:
        if(current_user != key) {
            ERROR("Access violation - invalid key!");
            res = CR_ACCESS_DENIED;
            break; 
        }
        if(current_state < STATE_BUSY) {
            WARN("Command %s is not allowed in this state!", cmd_name[cmd]);
            res = CR_NOT_PERMITTED;
            break;
        }
        if(ioctl(fd, HPI_CTL_BR) != 0) {
            WARN("Handshake failed (%s). Aborted!", strerror(errno));
            res = CR_TIME_OUT;
            goto post_resp;
        }
        if(block_write(id) != 0) {
            ERROR("Failed to write %d block - %s. Command aborted!", id, strerror(errno));
            res = CR_FAIL;
            goto send_nop;
        }
        res = CR_SUCCESS;
        break;
    case CMD_REQ_START:
        if(current_state < STATE_READY) {
            WARN("Command %s is not allowed in this state!", cmd_name[cmd]);
            res = CR_NOT_PERMITTED;
            break;
        }
        state = STATE_BUSY;
        if(ioctl(fd, HPI_CTL_BR) != 0) {
            WARN("Handshake failed (%s). Aborted!", strerror(errno));
            res = CR_TIME_OUT;
            goto send_nop;
        }
        if(block_read(id) != 0) {
            ERROR("Failed to read %d block (%s)! Aborted!", id, strerror(errno));
            res = CR_FAIL;
            goto post_resp;
        }
        res = CR_SUCCESS;
        break;
    }

    /* The remaining 28 or so similar commands */
}

As you can see, due to minor differences and the extensive use of break/goto statements, it is not possible to use functions or inlines. What I usually do is define some macros:

/* NOTE: DO NOT USE these macros outside of Big Switch */
#define CHECK_KEY(_key) \
   if(current_user != (_key)) \
   { \
      ERROR("Access violation!"); \
      res = CR_ACCESS_DENIED; \
      break; \
   }
#define CHECK_STATE(_state) \
   if(current_state < _state) \
   { \
      WARN("Command %s is not allowed in this state!", cmd_name[cmd]); \
      res = CR_NOT_PERMITTED; \
      break; \
   }

#define HANDSHAKE(_fail) \
   if(ioctl(fd, CTL_BR) != 0) \
   { \
      WARN("Handshake failed (%s). Aborted!", strerror(errno)); \
      res = CR_TIME_OUT; \
      goto _fail; \
   }

#define BLOCK_READ(_id, _fail) \
   if(block_read((int)(_id))!= 0) \
   { \
      ERROR("Failed to read %d block (%s)! Aborted!", (int)_id, strerror(errno)); \
      res = CR_FAIL; \
      goto _fail; \
   }

#define BLOCK_WRITE(_id, _fail) \
   if(block_write((int)(_id)) != 0) \
   { \
      ERROR("Failed to write %d block - %s. Aborted!", (int)_id, strerror(errno)); \
      res = CR_FAIL; \
      goto _fail; \
   }

..and write the same code using them. The code becomes much smaller and (arguably) more readable:

switch(cmd) 
{
case CMD_BLOCK_READ:
   CHECK_KEY(key);
   CHECK_STATE(STATE_BUSY);
   HANDSHAKE(post_resp);
   BLOCK_READ(id, send_nop);
   res = CR_SUCCESS;
   break;
case CMD_BLOCK_WRITE:
   CHECK_KEY(key);
   CHECK_STATE(STATE_BUSY);
   HANDSHAKE(post_resp);
   BLOCK_WRITE(id, send_nop);
   res = CR_SUCCESS;
   break;
case CMD_REQ_START:
{
   CHECK_STATE(STATE_READY);
   state = STATE_BUSY;
   HANDSHAKE(send_nop);
   BLOCK_READ(id, post_resp);
   res = CR_SUCCESS;
   break;
}
/* The remaining 28 or so similar commands */
<..>

The code looks more like some kind of scripting language than good old C and is really ugly, but I'm willing to sacrifice that for the sake of readability.

The question is how do you cope with similar situations? What are more elegant solutions and best practises?

P.S. I admit that in general case macros and goto statement is a sign of bad design, so no need to flame about how evil they are or how poor my programming style is.

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closed as not constructive by Vicky, netcoder, ybungalobill, Dancrumb, Graviton Feb 14 '13 at 10:14

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2  
At the very least, to prevent misuse of the macros, you should #undef them after your Big Switch. – nneonneo Feb 5 '13 at 12:38
    
More elegant solutions and best practices include avoiding macros and goto altogether. That's all I can think of. – netcoder Feb 5 '13 at 12:39
1  
defining function pointer and then array indexed on switch case would reduce the switch cases a lot. – rajneesh Feb 5 '13 at 12:40
    
@nneonneo they are defined in .c file, so no one should include them, but yes, I agree that it is a right thing to do. Will take your suggestion the next time I meet such a monster. – KBart Feb 5 '13 at 12:42
    
@rajneesh could you please elaborate more, and maybe even provide an example? – KBart Feb 5 '13 at 12:43

I'm not going to claim that the Python source code is the paragon of organization, but it contains (IMHO) a good example of macros being used to simplify a complex piece of code.

The Python main loop implements a bytecode-executing stack-based VM. It contains a huge switch-case with one case for every opcode Python supports. The dispatch for an opcode looks like this:

case STORE_ATTR:
    w = GETITEM(names, oparg);
    v = TOP();
    u = SECOND();
    STACKADJ(-2);
    err = PyObject_SetAttr(v, w, u); /* v.w = u */
    Py_DECREF(v);
    Py_DECREF(u);
    if (err == 0) continue;
    break;

where TOP, SECOND and STACKADJ are all defined as macros operating on the stack object . Some macros have alternate #defines used to assist with debugging. All of the opcodes are written in this way, and it helps make the implementation of each opcode much clearer by expressing the logic in this sort of miniature scripting language.

In my view, careful, judicious and limited use of macros can improve code readability and make the logic clearer. In your case, where the macros hide some small but nontrivial functionality, it can be useful to have macros to standardize the implementation and ensure that you don't have multiple copies of the same snippets of code to update.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing to Python sources, I'll take a look into it. Thank you. – KBart Feb 5 '13 at 13:06

In such situations I usually consider whether the cases may be reasonably described with a data, which are then processed in a single common block of code. Sure it cannot be done always, but often it is possible.

In your case it might lead to something similar to the following:


#define IO_NOOP    0
#define IO_READ    1
#define IO_WRITE   2

struct cmd_desc { 
   int check_key;     /* non-zero to do a check */
   int check_state;
   int new_state;
   void* handshake_fail;
   int io_dir;
   void* io_fail;
};

const struct cmd_desc cmd_desc_list[] = {
   { 1, STATE_BUSY,  -1,         &&post_resp, IO_READ,  &&send_nop },  /* CMD_BLOCK_READ */
   { 1, STATE_BUSY,  -1,         &&post_resp, IO_WRITE, &&send_nop },  /* CMD_BLOCK_WRITE */
   { 0, STATE_READY, STATE_BUSY, &&send_nop,  IO_READ,  &&post_rep }   /* CMD_REQ_START */
};

const struct cmd_desc* cmd_desc = cmds[cmd];

if(cmd_desc->check_key) {
   if(current_user != key) {
      ERROR("Access violation - invalid key!");
      return CR_ACCESS_DENIED;
   }
}

if(cmd_desc->check_state != -1) {
   if(current_state check_state) {
      WARN("Command %s is not allowed in this state!", cmd_name[cmd]);
      return CR_NOT_PERMITTED;
   }
}

if(cmd_desc->new_state != -1)
   state = cmd_desc->new_state;

switch(cmd_desc->io_dir) {
   case IO_READ:
      if(block_read(id) != 0) {
         ERROR("Failed to read %d block (%s)! Aborted!", id, strerror(errno));
         res = CR_FAIL;
         goto *cmd_desc->io_fail;
      }
      break;

   case IO_WRITE:
      if(block_write(id) != 0) {
         ERROR("Failed to write %d block (%s)! Aborted!", id, strerror(errno));
         res = CR_FAIL;
         goto *cmd_desc->io_fail;
      }
      break;

   case IO_NOOP:
      break;
}

res = CR_SUCCESS;

Notes I used "Labels as Values" extension of gcc for the goto labels (http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Labels-as-Values.html). In standard C you might use function pointers instead but that would require some reorganization of the code and I do not have enough info for that.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 as the command descriptor list is surely an interesting idea. Sadly, I may not be able to try your example in practice as I usually have to stick to the standard C. – KBart Feb 5 '13 at 13:54
    
With some more code reorganization if may be replaced with ifs or function pointers (each small code block would have to be function). It's the core idea what matters, not exact way how it is achieved. – mity Feb 5 '13 at 13:59

With the code you posted, there is no reason you couldn't have used functions. This would be the "Extract Function" refactoring pattern. To handle the gotos, just leave them in your main function, and call them or not based on the function result.

http://www.refactoring.com/catalog/extractMethod.html

Also, you've really made a mess of things by using variables in the macros that are not passed in. This means you can't reuse them easily and they are arguably worse than writing the whole thing long-hand. If you passed in everything that is used by the macro, then it is more useful. Then you get a duck-typing style coding, which can be used effectively.

Also, you are using C, so you shouldn't "avoid" macros. They are incredibly useful, primarily for code generation. (i.e. stringification and concatentation) Many C++ and some other say "macros are evil". This is C, macros are not evil.

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